Buying Guide: Best 2016 Crossovers

By

Contributing Editor

A veteran auto journalist and editor of Tirekicking Today, Jim has contributed countless reviews and articles to such publications as autoMedia, New Car Test Drive, and Kelley Blue Book, as well as J.D. Power, cars.com, Consumer Guide, and the Chicago Tribune. He began by writing about antique/classic cars and how-to tasks, before turning to new and used vehicles. Most of his 30 published books have dealt with auto history, along with six children’s titles. His most recent book is the Tirekicking Used Car Buyer’s Guide.


, Contributing Editor - January 5, 2016

Try to pick a few favorites in the crossover category, and you quickly realize the extent to which those vehicles have taken over. With such a frightful number of possibilities, narrowing the roster down to five is an especially formidable undertaking. Fortunately for the decision-making process, full-fledged SUVs (many still truck-based) fall into a separate category. Crossovers may be defined as the wagon-like vehicles that are more carlike in construction. Ranging from mini to midsize, they typically – but not necessarily – come with front-drive or available all-wheel drive.

Complicating the procedure, nearly all vehicles in this category have made great progress in recent years, in terms of refinement, roadability, safety features, fuel economy, and presence or availability of creature comforts. To take just one example, the Dodge Journey wouldn’t have come close to consideration a few years back. Today, it almost made the cut, due to near-startling improvements in ride quality, smoothness, quietness, and even handling.

2016 Mazda CX-5
Mazda CX-5

When one vehicle in an automaker’s lineup proves to be disappointing, there’s invariably a tendency to be skeptical about a new model from that company. That’s what happened when I first got behind the wheel of Mazda’s compact CX-5 crossover, launched as a 2013 model.

For years, Mazda had touted what was called its “zoom-zoom” tradition, suggesting that even the company’s relatively ordinary models had a sportier inner nature than the competition. That had been true for nearly every Mazda I’d road-tested, except one: a larger forerunner to this CX-5.

Imagine my surprise, then, when the CX-5 proved to be a winner, exuding excellence and, yes, that temporarily diminished sporty character. Exceptionally easy to drive and control, this compact is a frisky performer that feels stable and corners smartly, even riding better than usual in this class. The CX-5 looks more distinctive than most, too. Mazda’s new CX-3 exhibits many of the same attributes, in a trimmer size.

2016 Honda CR-V
Honda CR-V

Originally, the bigger Honda Pilot was a prime candidate for this space, representing the familiar mainstream among crossover/SUVs. Instead, I decided to go with the compact CR-V, which has given Honda a staunch contender in the crossover-vehicle derby ever since 1997.

Honda’s main competitor has long been the Toyota RAV4, which had emerged a year earlier. As the years rolled by, a seemingly interminable stream of contenders entered the fray. Yet, Honda’s compact managed to stay just a bit ahead of the pack, including its Toyota archrival.

Does a CR-V really beat the RAV4? How does it stand against rivals from Hyundai, Kia, Chevrolet, Ford, and others? Most challengers are well-made and admirably-behaved on pavement; and with all-wheel drive, capable of modest rural-wilderness achievements. So, is Honda truly Number One in its class? Is Pilot definitively the top midsize? The only possible answer is a definite “maybe.”

Honda’s latest competition comes not from another manufacturer, but from its excellent new HR-V subcompact.

2016 Jeep Cherokee
Jeep Cherokee

Let’s be clear: the Cherokee, launched for 2014, is a striking modernization of old Jeep ideas, which instills controversy. Maybe it’s not quite a love/hate quandary, more of a like versus dislike. Or, appreciation opposed to disdain. Whatever it’s termed, some rigorous Jeepsters insist that the Cherokee practically obliterates the long-standing Jeep image.

Well, the Cherokee is different. No getting around that. So is the recently-introduced Renegade, which strays from Jeep tradition in a similar way.

Because I’m not an off-road devotee, I tend to lean away from the more intense SUVs, Jeep or otherwise, in favor of models that stand apart in non-traditional ways. Cherokee is a Jeep for people who never imagined they’d crave a Jeep, or even look at one with interest. Yet, it’s also a true Trail Rated Jeep, not an ill-equipped poseur.

Because a Cherokee Trailhawk rides so smoothly and quietly, handling so effortlessly on-pavement, it’s hard to believe that a truly purposeful Jeep lurks beneath the unfamiliar surface.

2016 Infiniti QX70
Infiniti QX70

Premium-level crossovers could practically be in a category by themselves, with so many excellent choices offering a luscious helping of luxury. Nissan’s luxury division offers several such models, including the impressive midsize QX70 – which used to be known as the FX, until Infiniti revised its model-naming scheme.

This is one serious road machine, highlighted as always by superior handling. Few crossovers or SUVs of any sort yield such a level of total confidence, responding precisely to driver requests at the steering wheel. Performance might not match that of the prior V8 version, which disappeared during 2014. The 3.7-liter V6 responds briskly and, as expected, consumes less fuel – though frugal is hardly the word for its gas-mileage estimate. Automatic-transmission shifts are barely discernible, typically taking place at just the right moment.

Forward visibility could be better, but the QX70's instruments and controls stand tall as they are, while the high-mounted navigation screen is among the easiest to read and use. As luxury vehicles should, the cabin practically invites you inside.

2016 Nissan Juke
Nissan Juke

Most SUVs, and crossovers too, suffer from a case of sameness. Sure, some are more bolt-upright than others. Some display a greater number of curves. Still, telling them apart isn’t so easy, even for folks who pay attention to new models and redesigns.

Not so Nissan’s Juke. Few crossover models are anywhere near as distinctive, so one-of-a-kind, as the Juke, which deserves its eccentric name. Better yet, the Juke performs in accord with its appearance: bold and scrappy, gleeful and upbeat.

Nissan has been a prominent proponent of continuously variable transmissions (CVTs), and uses one for the Juke. Enthusiasts often scoff at CVTs, insisting that they simply keep engine rpm excessively high, and bemoaning the feel of physical gears changing. Since I am not part of that naysaying group, the Juke’s CVT is a bonus, not a detriment. Besides, Nissan includes a D-Step Logic manual-shifting mode that simulates the action of real gears.

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, Contributing Editor

A veteran auto journalist and editor of Tirekicking Today, Jim has contributed countless reviews and articles to such publications as autoMedia, New Car Test Drive, and Kelley Blue Book, as well as J.D. Power, cars.com, Consumer Guide, and the Chicago Tribune. He began by writing about antique/classic cars and how-to tasks, before turning to new and used vehicles. Most of his 30 published books have dealt with auto history, along with six children’s titles. His most recent book is the Tirekicking Used Car Buyer’s Guide.