5 Most Popular German Sports Cars

May 30, 2014

German engineering is world renowned in the automotive field, but the first name to come to mind in German sports cars is Porsche. That name stands tall in the world of European sports cars, with or without the German classification. There are really quite a few German manufacturers that have built cars that fit that list, though.

Audi

Outside of Porsche, perhaps the most obvious choice for German sports cars is Audi. Like many of the other manufacturers in Germany, they don’t restrict themselves to just producing any one type of car and do have a lot of focus on luxury vehicles. They’ve produced some excellent sports cars over the years like the Quattro series. You can’t forget their TT line, either, though. These days Audi is essentially a subsidiary of Volkswagen.

BMW

BMW is probably best known for its luxury vehicles. That’s definitely a big part of their output, but they also produce race cars and the “M” series are production level race cars. BMW is certainly known for engineering expertise, but they are also innovative and willing to produce cars for any and all markets—even the sports car market.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes is probably not a name that immediately comes to mind when someone thinks of sports cars. Like BMW, they are best known for producing luxury cars. Still, Mercedes has produced sports cars over the years and have contributed to the world of racing. They’ve even collaborated with McLaren on a limited production sports car.

Porsche

Certainly the most obvious choice when it comes to German sports cars, Porsche really is company that’s devoted to sports cars. If anyone gives the Italians a run for their money, it’s Porsche. They’ve produced a lot of different models over the years, but currently the most popular Porsches in the United States are the 911, Boxster and Cayenne.

Volkswagen

Volkswagen might not be an obvious addition to the list, but they have built a few sports cars over the years. Perhaps the most obvious one was the Karmann Ghia. Sure, it was called, even by dealers at times, "the world's slowest sports car," but it was a sports car all the same.

Germany might not seem as much like the center of European sports car manufacturing that Italy is. Still, even when you look beyond Porsche, there are some great sports cars that have come out of Germany. Of course, Porsche by itself would earn them their position in the royalty of sports car manufacturing countries.

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