Chevrolet Equinox vs. Honda CR-V

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Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

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, Automotive Editor - February 5, 2018

The Honda CR-V has long been a dominant force in the compact crossover realm, and its 2017 redesign made it even better. Many crossovers have attempted to challenge the CR-V’s position atop the segment. While some have come close, none have been able to unseat it.

Enter the all-new Chevrolet Equinox, which is smaller, lighter, nimbler, and more fuel efficient than ever before. Can this revamped American crossover roll in and take over the slot as top dog in this segment? Continue reading to find out.

See a side-by-side comparison of the CR-V & Equinox »

What the Equinox Gets Right

With a starting price of $24,575 (destination fees included), the Equinox is $550 cheaper than the base CR-V. While this isn’t a big difference, any gap in pricing is huge in this highly competitive segment. At this lower price point, the Equinox is very well equipped too, boasting Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a seven-inch touchscreen, 4G LTE wifi connectivity, 17-inch wheels, and active noise cancellation as standard features.

While the base Equinox’s 1.5-liter engine lacks the horsepower of the CR-V’s base 2.4-liter, its 203 pound-feet of torque bests the CR-V’s base unit by 23 lb-ft. What’s more, this pulling power is available from lower in the rev band, making it more accessible. Moving up the range, the Equinox pulls away from the CR-V with an optional 2.0-liter turbocharged engine with 252 hp and a 1.6-liter diesel with 137 hp and 240 lb-ft of torque. This torquey diesel is thrifty too, as it’s rated up to 32 miles per gallon combined.

What the CR-V Gets Right

The base CR-V’s cabin may not have all the gadgets and gizmos the base Equinox has, but it lacks the Chevy's cheap plastics. Additionally, the CR-V’s interior is roomier in virtually every important measurement. This is particularly true in cargo room, as the CR-V boasts an extra 9.3 cubic feet with the rear seats up and an extra 12.3 cubes with the seats folded.

All the extra room inside the CR-V translates into a more comfortable ride for all occupants. The seats are wider, there is more room to move around, and fitting three adults in the rear seat is not a chore like it is in the Chevy. On top of being more spacious, the CR-V’s build quality makes it feel like a more upscale vehicle – this is amplified as you move up in trim level.

Safety is another feather in the CR-V’s cap, as its standard automatic emergency braking and top-level crash test ratings make it an IIHS Top Safety Pick. The Equinox, on the other hand, makes buyers pay extra for automatic emergency braking (and the best active safety systems are limited to the range-topping models), and the IIHS has yet to complete its crash tests.

Going With a Base Model? Pick the Equinox

The base-level Equinox is a great buy. Its standard turbocharged engine is potent, and its array of standard features easily beat the CR-V LX.

Verdict: Honda CR-V

Once you get out of that base level, though, the CR-V quickly pulls away, thanks to its roomier cabin, larger cargo area, more premium feel, and more comfortable seating.

Take a closer look at the Honda CR-V »

Take a closer look at the Chevrolet Equinox »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

Follow On: Google+ | Website