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2018 Porsche 911

Porsche 911 OEM Exterior Primary Photo
OEM Interior Primary
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OEM Exterior
OEM Interior
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Used Car Price Range
$75,998 - $429,900
$75,998 $429,900
Select a Trim
Select a Trim
2018 Carrera 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe
most popular
Price:   -  From $91,100
2018 Carrera 4 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $98,000
2018 Carrera T 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $102,100
2018 Carrera 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $103,400
2018 Carrera S 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $105,100
2018 Carrera 4 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $110,300
2018 Targa 4 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $110,300
2018 Carrera 4S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $112,000
2018 Carrera S 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $117,400
2018 Carrera GTS 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $120,700
2018 Carrera 4S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $124,300
2018 Targa 4S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $124,300
2018 Carrera 4 GTS 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $127,600
2018 Carrera GTS 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $133,000
2018 Carrera 4 GTS 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $139,900
2018 Targa 4 GTS 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $139,900
2018 GT3 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $143,600
2018 Turbo 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $161,800
2018 Turbo 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $174,100
2018 Turbo S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $190,700
2018 Turbo S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $203,000
2018 GT2 RS 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $293,200
Expert Rating
Unavailable

Our expert ratings are based on seven comprehensive criteria: quality, safety, comfort, performance, fuel economy, reliability history and value.

You can interpret our ratings in the following way:

: Outstanding vehicle. Only the most exceptional vehicles achieve this rating.

: Very Good vehicle. Very good and close to being the best vehicle in its class.

: Good vehicle. Decent, but not quite the best. Often affordable, but lacking key features found in vehicles of the same class.

: Below average vehicle. Not recommended, and lacking attributes a car buyer would come to expect for the price.

: Poor vehicle. Simply does not deserve to be on the road.

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Overview

Since its inception in 1963 the Porsche 911 has been the bread-and-butter for Germany's famed sportscar manufacturer and has continuously helped prove that preservation, especially when it comes to a rear-engine layout, can work. After getting the largest overhaul in its entire history last year, 2018 brings new changes for a few models and some new additions to the already-lengthy lineup.

What's New for 2018

After a slew of changes for the 911 Carrera, Carrera S, and Targa models last year, which included a new twin-turbocharged, 3.0-liter flat-six engine, the majority of additions for the 2018 model year took place on the GTS trims and a few new additions, including a new GT3 model and a new Turbo S Exclusive Series.

Five versions are available for the 911 GTS trim, which include the 911 Carrera GTS, 911 Carrera 4 GTS – available as both a Coupe and Cabriolet – and 911 Targa 4 GTS. All GTS models boast 450 hp and 405 lb-ft of torque, an increase of 20 horsepower over the old 911 GTS models. Other changes include the wider Carrera 4 body as standard, increasing each GTS model’s rear track width by 40 millimeters, satin black 21-inch center lock wheels from the 911 Turbo S, and a new SportDesign front fascia.

For 2018, the 911 GT3 makes a comeback with some drool-worthy changes. While the rest of the 911 lineup went turbocharged, the GT3 continues to be powered by a naturally-aspirated engine. This time, though, power comes from a 4.0-liter flat-six pumping out 500 hp and 339 lb-ft of torque, which is 25 hp and 15 lb-ft more than the previous model. There's also an available manual transmission, which should please Porsche's many purists.

Another new addition to the lineup arrives in the form of the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series for 2018, as well. The model, which is limited to just 500 units worldwide, is heavily based off of the 911 Turbo S, but has more power – 607 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque from the 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six. The PASM active suspension and the Sport Chrono package are standard.

Lastly, 2018 marks the return of the GT2 RS, a vehicle that was nicknamed "widowmaker" in previous generations for its ruthless driving character. The vehicle, according to Porsche, is the fastest and most powerful 911 ever made. Powered by a twin-turbo flat-six engine, the GT2 RS generates 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque and is capable of propelling the car to 60 mph in just 2.7 seconds and onto a top speed of 211 mph.

For true track junkies, the GT2 RS can be fitted with an optional Weissach Package that cuts roughly 40 pounds from the car and adds sportier items, including magnesium wheels, carbon fiber anti-roll bars, a carbon-fiber roof, and exposed carbon-fiber weave on the luggage compartment lid and roof.

Porsche 911

Choosing Your Porsche 911

With 21 911 models to choose from, finding the perfect trim can be a difficult task. Each vehicle, despite looking similar to others in the lineup, is distinct and unique, and the daunting decision can be a little easier if interested buyers narrow down the choice down by price, power, and rear- or all-wheel drive.

After those decisions have been made, things get really difficult. Porsche has arguably the most expansive catalog of options in the entire industry – it's no exaggeration when we say that you can almost double a car's starting price in optional extras. With that in mind, we've chosen some of the most popular or worthwhile options and included them here. This list is not exhaustive and does not include the staggering array of interior and exterior styling options.

Porsche 911

911 Carrera

The base 911 model, the Carrera comes in five different trims, Carrera, Carrera 4, Carrera Cabriolet, Carrera 4 Cabriolet, and Targa 4 – the "4" designation denotes all-wheel drive models. Prices for the Carrera start at $92,150 (all prices include $1,050 for fees) and go up to $111,350 for the Carrera 4 Cabriolet. Each variant is powered by a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six generating 370 hp and 325 lb-ft of torque. The seven-speed automatic is a $3,210 option.

Standard features on the 911 Carrera include 19-inch wheels, Porsche's adaptive suspension (Porsche Active Suspension Management), Bluetooth, four-way, power-adjustable sport seats, a seven-inch touchscreen infotainment system, dual-zone climate control, bi-xenon headlights, and a nine-speaker audio system.

We recommend inspecting the $3,980 Premium Package (powered, 14-way sport seats, LED headlights with active front lighting, heated and ventilated front seats, and auto-dimming mirrors), adaptive cruise control ($2,490 and only available with an automatic), and the 12-speaker Burmester audio system ($5,300).

Porsche 911

911 Carrera S

Starting at $106,150, the 911 Carrera S comes in five different variants, including the Carrera S, Carrera 4S, Carrera S Cabriolet, Carrera 4S Cabriolet, and Targa 4S. The entire Carrera S lineup utilizes a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six producing 420 hp and 368 lb-ft of torque. The automatic transmission remains a $3,210 option.

The list of standard features on 911 Carrera S models is nearly identical to the one for base Carrera models, with the addition of Porsche Torque Vectoring or Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus, for improved agility.

Optional packages for Carrera S models are similar to base Carrera models, as well, with the addition of the Sport Package ($6,460), which adds rear axle steering, a sport exhaust system, the Sport Chrono Package, a GT sport steering wheel, and SportDesign exterior mirrors, and the 3.0 S Powerkit Sport Package ($13,770), which bumps power up to 450 hp and includes everything from the standard Sport Package.

Porsche 911

911 Carrera GTS

Freshly updated for 2018, the Carrera GTS comes in five different styles – Carrera GTS, which starts at $121,750, Carrera GTS Cabriolet, Carrera 4 GTS, Carrera 4 GTS Cabriolet, and Targa 4 GTS. All of the GTS models feature a 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six engine making 450 hp and 405 lb-ft of torque. The automatic transmission jumps up to $3,730).

The GTS models stand out with tinted taillights, black logos, satin black strips on the rear lid grill, high-gloss black center-mounted exhaust pipes, and SportDesign exterior mirrors. The 911 Targa 4 GTS models also gets a black roof bar.

Standard features on GTS models include, the Sport Chrono Package, Porsche Torque Vectoring, Porsche Active Suspension Management, Enhanced Porsche Stability Management, a SportDesign front fascia, a sports exhaust system, LED headlights with active front lighting, four-way sport seats in Alcantara, and brushed aluminum interior trim.

We recommend the $4,130 GTS Package, which adds Alcantara suede trim throughout and retain much of the Premium Package for an added charge. Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control is a pricey option at $3,170, but makes for a tremendous improvement in the GTS' already agile handling character, while the $5,300 Burmester stereo remains a smart choice.

Porsche 911

911 Turbo

Making the large jump in both price and performance to the 911 Turbo models brings five styles to choose from, the 911 Turbo, 911 Turbo S, 911 Turbo Cabriolet, 911 Turbo S Cabriolet, and 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series. The base 911 Turbo starts at $162,850, while the most-expensive model, the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series, is priced at $258,050. Porsche 911 Turbo models are powered by twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six engines making 540 hp and 523 lb-ft of torque.

Turbo S models utilize the same basic engine, but have larger turbos and different engine tuning for more power, with 580 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque on offer. The range-topping Turbo S Exclusive Series takes things to another level with 607 hp. Both the Turbo S and Turbo S Exclusive Series include ultra-high-performance carbon-ceramic brakes as standard. All Turbo models put power down through an all-wheel-drive system and a seven-speed PDK transmission – if you want the purest 911 driving experience, we recommend the GTS or Carrera S over the Turbo.

The 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series is fitted with various carbon fiber components, including the roof, side skirts, front truck lid, and roof. The rear fascia has been redesigned to include twin tailpipes with black finishes. Just like the two-tone color choice on the outside, the interior features two Golden Yellow stripes, Golden Yellow lettering, and an Alcantara suede roof lining. The door sill guards are finished in carbon fiber and the Exclusive Series lettering is illuminated.

Standard equipment for Turbo and Turbo S models includes rear-axle steering, variable power steering, Porsche Active Suspension Management, larger front and rear brakes, 12-speaker Bose Surround Sound System, interior lighting, LED headlights with active front lighting, two-zone automatic climate control, and 14-way Power Sport Seats. The option list remains exhaustive but is free of option packages – everything here is a la carte.

Porsche 911

911 GT3

The 911 GT3 returns with even more power and a new look for 2018. At the back of the car sits a 4.0-liter flat-six that cranks out 500 hp and 339 lb-ft of torque. Drivers can choose between a six-speed gearbox and a PDK transmission with power going to the rear wheels. Getting to 60 mph takes just 3.2 seconds for vehicles equipped with the PDK gearbox, while the car’s top speed is rated at 197 for the same configuration.

Standard features on the 911 GT3 include: Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus, 20-inch center-locking wheels, dynamic engine mounts, rear-axle steering with sport tuning, adaptive suspension, an adjustable chassis, SportDesign exterior mirrors, a sport exhaust system, eight-speaker audio system, the Porsche Track Precision App, a 4.6-inch TFT color display, and four-way sport seats plus.

Porsche shows a degree of restraint with the GT3's options catalog, although it's still extensive. If you're planning on daily driving this track star, though, we recommend the $2,590 Front Axle Lift System. It adds a lot of weight, but will keep you from scraping the GT3's low nose on steep driveways and speed bumps.

Porsche 911

911 GT2 RS

Making a comeback for 2018 is the insanely powerful 911 GT2 RS. The GT2 RS is powered by a twin-turbo 3.8-liter six-cylinder engine that generates 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque, which is good enough for a zero to 60 mph time of 2.7 seconds and a top speed of 211 mph. Porsche claims that the new GT2 RS is the most powerful road-legal 911 ever built.

Standard equipment on the GT2 RS includes scheduled maintenance for the first 10,000 miles or one year, Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB), yellow brake calipers, a magnesium roof, dual titanium black exhaust pipes, eight-speaker sound system, Porsche Track Precision App, a rear-view camera, two-zone climate control, GT2 RS-specific leather/alcantara upholstery, a sport steering wheel, and full bucket seats. A life insurance policy is not included, but we strongly recommend it.

CarsDirect Tip

There are millions of ways to configure a 911 and finding the right one for you will take time. We recommend trying to keep the option’s list as short as possible, especially with the numerous styling touches, as prices can get out of hand quickly. Instead, we'd recommend focusing on functional improvements, rather than things that change your 911's look.

Get your price on a Porsche 911 »

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Automotive Editor
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Expert Review

Expert Rating
Unavailable

Our expert ratings are based on seven comprehensive criteria: quality, safety, comfort, performance, fuel economy, reliability history and value.

You can interpret our ratings in the following way:

: Outstanding vehicle. Only the most exceptional vehicles achieve this rating.

: Very Good vehicle. Very good and close to being the best vehicle in its class.

: Good vehicle. Decent, but not quite the best. Often affordable, but lacking key features found in vehicles of the same class.

: Below average vehicle. Not recommended, and lacking attributes a car buyer would come to expect for the price.

: Poor vehicle. Simply does not deserve to be on the road.

author image
Automotive Editor

After more than 50 years of continuous development and production, the Porsche 911 needs no introduction as the recognized standard for upscale sports cars. Marque fanatics and advertising agencies may lean on that history, but it's unnecessary; if the 911 had been introduced for 2018 it would still be one of the very best cars in the world. The current 911 doesn't live on its reputation – it continues to assertively move it forward.

Best Value

Going by the count on Porsche's online configurator, the 911 is available in 24 [sic] different varieties. All use the same time-honored architecture: a teardrop-shaped two-door body encloses a pleasantly spacious (for a sports car) cabin with the motor situated behind the rear axle line. From there the variations blossom: rear- or all-wheel drive, coupe or Cabriolet (convertible) or Targa, and an alphabet soup of letters denoting trim levels. All 911s save the hardcore roadracer GT3 and GT3 RS are powered by turbocharged flat-six engines in varying states of tune, from a potent 370 horsepower on the base 911 Carrera to a Le Mans-grade 700 hp on the GT2 RS. The two available transmissions – a traditional manual and the excellent PDK semiautomatic – run that power through seven speeds. The GT3s are powered by fiercely edgy naturally aspirated flat-sixes that make either 500 or 520 hp and spin their huge rear wheels through the PDK gearbox or, by special request on the "regular" GT3, a six-speed manual.

Obviously, buying a 911 isn't about value in the normal sense. Depending on sales tax and other fees, any 911 will require a six-figure check, and that's before a buyer starts contemplating Porsche's mile-long options list. Available extras range from carbon-ceramic brakes to leather-wrapped climate-control vents and consistently tend to be pricey.

Deep potential for personalization aside, even a base 911 Carrera is a wonderfully capable performance car made of top-grade materials assembled to exacting standards – everything a Porsche should be. Add a few quality-of-life upgrades and one can order a 911 that's roundly fulfilling without causing too much financial angst:

  • Model: 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera
  • Engine: 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged six-cylinder
  • Output: 370 hp / 331 lb-ft
  • Transmission: Seven-speed manual
  • Drivetrain: Rear-wheel drive
  • Fuel Economy: 20 City / 29 Hwy
  • Options: Leather seat trim with leather interior ($3,850), Sport Chrono package ($2,090), sunroof ($1,500), Porsche Dynamic Light System ($780, dynamic cornering lights, headlight range control, sport mode, headlight cleaning system), heated front seats ($700), rear window wiper ($370).
  • Base Price: $92,150 (including a $1,050 destination charge)
  • Best Value Price: $101,440

Performance

Porsche 911

Competing manufacturers openly use the 911 as a performance reference both in engineering and marketing, and for good reason. Nothing else on the market provides as complete a package of speed, handling, and refinement. The base Carrera, S, and GTS are supremely resolved all-around driving machines; the all-wheel-drive versions will power through any weather condition short of a flood; the 911 Turbos are road-going business jets; the GT3 RS and GT2 RS are as close as any manufacturer gets to selling a racing car with turn signals and a license-plate frame.

Beyond the world-class acceleration and skidpad numbers, the key to the 911's greatness is its civility and accessibility. These are not high-strung machines that require expert hands and are only happy at the limit; an average driver can use – and enjoy – the great majority of any 911's abilities on a regular basis. (Insider note: the new 911 Carrera T, with its lowered suspension and shorter gearing and lighter weight, may be the best pure driver's car of the family in the real world).

What one can call weaknesses in the 911's performance are entirely subjective and rooted in the car's lengthy history – namely, the constant lament that a new 911 isn't as pure or direct as a vintage 911. The current car is bigger and heavier, the electrically-assisted steering lacks the live-wire feel of the old unassisted setup, and throttle response with the turbo motors is inevitably less immediate and linear than the naturally-aspirated powerplants from a few years ago. Such is the price of regulations and shifting customer tastes.

Style

Nothing else looks like a 911, which is both wonderful and somewhat controversial. Some still jeer its Volkswagen Beetle ancestry; others grow impatient with Porsche's devotion to the basic silhouette; the debate about whether added wings and spoilers are exciting or tacky (or both) will never end. Suffice to say that many people like the shape, quite a few love it, and those who find it unattractive are entitled to their opinions.

By contrast, the 911's cabin is an undisputed aesthetic master class, modern and sophisticated without being cold or excessive. First-time 911 drivers do need to remember that the key goes into the switch on the left side of the steering column, a quirk retained from Porsche's early racing cars. The instruments are dominated by a large tachometer – again, per tradition – and controls are thoughtfully arranged to allow the driver to concentrate on the road and the task at hand.

The Best and Worst Things

The great thing about a 911 isn't that it's fast; it's that it's fast while being completely usable and without being irritating. It'll capably handle daily-driver duty, travel swiftly and securely from coast to coast, and run with – or past – anything else on the most technically demanding paved roads in the world.

Provided you can cover a 911's purchase price and costs, the biggest annoyance about ownership may be the Greek chorus of judgement and second-guessing from others that constantly accompanies the car. If you opt for the base 911 Carrera, are you aiming for the essential experience or buying into the cult as cheaply as possible? Is that GT3 owner a committed trackday addict or a showy poseur? Cabriolet: joie de vivre or exhibitionism? Is opting for the PDK transmission a step toward faster shifts or posh laziness? Our advice is simply to ignore it all and enjoy the drive, which is still one of the great experiences in the world.

Right For? Wrong For?

Porsche 911

Do you understand how life should be a balance between style, power, manners, and comfort? Do you have the maturity to properly use a very fast machine that lives in the everyday world? Do you want a dignified and usable commuter that has the same basic structure as a car that can qualify at the 12 Hours of Sebring? Some version of the 911 is consistently the default choice for an upscale sports car among serious drivers, and it continues to earn every bit of that credibility.

Do you want to cover distances in meditative peace? The 911 is among the best long-range runners in the world, but it's not a tranquil cruiser; there's always a subliminal intensity in the background. Do you need to carry more than one passenger? The rear seats that are standard on most 911s promise more usability than a strict two-seater like a Corvette or Aston Martin Vantage, but are best used as package shelves. Do you place value on arriving instead of getting there? Unless you've opted for the GT2 RS or one of the GT3s with their enormous wings, gaudier (and even more expensive) exotics like the Lamborghini Huracán or maximum luxury tourers like the Bentley Continental draw more attention than the relatively common and subdued 911.

The Bottom Line

If you care about driving and can afford one, a 2018 Porsche 911 is worth every bit of its high price. Its history may grant the 911 greater recognition and cachet than its competitors, but feel free to appreciate its traditions on top of its status as a fully contemporary – and indisputably great – sports car.

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Specs & Features

Highlights
Overall Crash Safety Rating
Not Available
Engine - Cylinders/Horsepower/Torque
3.0L H-6 / 370 HP / 331 ft.lbs.
Transmission
Standard: 7-spd man w/OD
Available: 7-spd sequential shift control auto-shift man w/OD
Drive Type
Rear-wheel
Fuel Economy - City/Highway/Combined
20 / 29 / 24 Mpg
Passenger Capacity
4
Bumper to Bumper Warranty
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Mechanical Specs
Engine - Cylinders/Horsepower/Torque
3.0L H-6 / 370 HP / 331 ft.lbs.
Drive Type
Rear-wheel
Fuel Economy - City/Hwy/Combined
20 / 29 / 24 Mpg
Brakes
4-wheel Disc
Front Suspension
Strut
Rear Suspension
Independent Multi-link
Spare Tire And Wheel
Fuel Tank
16.9 Gal.
Recommended Fuel Type
Premium Unleaded
Average Cost To Fill Tank
$65
Dimensions & Capabilities
Maximum Cargo Volume
14.2 Cu.ft.
Passenger Volume
Exterior Length
177.1 "
Exterior Width
71.2 "
Exterior Height
50.9 "
Front Headroom
Rear Headroom
Front Legroom
Rear Legroom
Front Shoulder Room
Rear Shoulder Room
Front Hip Room
Rear Hip Room
Curb Weight
3,153 Lbs. / 3,197 Lbs.
Wheel Base
97 "
Turning Radius
18.3 '
Exterior Features
Door Count
2 Doors
Wheels
19.0 " Silver Forged Aluminum / 20.0 " Silver Forged Aluminum / 20.0 " Machined W/painted Accents Forged Aluminum / 20.0 " Polished W/painted Accents Forged Aluminum
Paint
Clearcoat Monotone / Metallic Monotone
Exterior Mirrors
Dual Power Remote Heated
Bumpers
Body-colored / Front Body-colored
Grille Moldings
Rear Spoiler
Power
Exhaust
Dual Stainless Steel With Polished Tailpipe Finish / Dual Stainless Steel With Black Tailpipe Finish
Interior Features
Seating
Passenger Capacity
4
Seat Trim
Leather / Leather/sport-tex Cloth/leather / Alcantara Simulated Suede/leather
Front Seat Type
Sport Bucket
Heated Front Seats
Driver And Front Passenger Heated-cushion, Heated-seatback
Front Driver Seat Direction Controls
6-way (4-way Power) / (10-way Power) / (12-way Power)
Front Passenger Seat Direction Controls
6-way (4-way Power) / (10-way Power) / (12-way Power)
Front Armrests
6-way (4-way Power) / (10-way Power) / (12-way Power)
Rear Armrests
Rear Seats
50-50 Bucket
Radio & Infotainment
Radio
Siriusxm Am/fm/hd/satellite, Seek-scan
Speakers
8 / 12 Burmester / 12 Bose
Radio Steering Wheel Controls
Apple Car Play
Android Auto
Bluetooth w/ Hands-Free Connectivity
Convenience Features
Steering Wheel Type
Telescopic Tilt Style / Power Telescopic Tilt Style
Climate Control
Automatic Air Conditioning
Cruise Control
Sun Roof
Express Open/close
Rearview Mirror
Day-night / Auto-dimming Day-night
One Touch Open Window
Driver And Passenger
Tinted Windows
Light
Vanity Mirrors
Dual Illuminated
Remote Keyless Entry
Keyfob (all Doors)
Power Outlets
3
Safety Features
Overall Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Overall Front Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Overall Side Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Rollover Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Front Impact Airbags
Driver And Passenger W/passenger Front-impact Cancellable
Driver Side Impact Airbags
Seat Mounted
Knee Airbag
Driver And Passenger
Passenger Side Impact Airbag
Seat Mounted
Rear Side Airbag
Seatbelt Pretensioners
Front
Anti-Lock Brakes
4-wheel Anti-lock Brakes (abs)
Forward Collision Warning
Porsche Active Safe (pas) Forward Collision Mitigation
Blind Spot Sensor
Lane Change Assist (lca) Blind Spot
Lane Departure Warning
Autonomous Cruise Control
Pedestrian Detection
Driver Attention Alert
Daytime Running Lights
Auto High Beams
Auto High-beam
Adaptive Headlights
Directionally Adaptive / Porsche Dynamic Light System (pdls) Directionally Adaptive
Parking Sensors
Parkassist Front And Rear
Security Systems
Security System
Panic Alarm
Ignition Disable
Immobilizer
Warranty
Bumper To Bumper Months Miles
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Major Components Months
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Included Maintenance Months
Roadside Assistance Months
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Corrosion Perforation
144 Months / Unlimited Miles
Accessories Months
24 Months / Unlimited Miles

Used 2018 Porsche 911 for Sale

8 vehicles found within 50 miles of your area
Porsche
Carrera 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe
Color: Silver
Price

$75,998

Mileage

43,072 mi

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Porsche Downtown LA (11 mi)

Phone: (213) 222-1295
Porsche
Carrera
Color: Blue
Price

$81,995

Mileage

37,480 mi

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Impero Cars Inc (8 mi)

Phone: (310) 340-0709
Porsche
Carrera 4 GTS
Color: Silver
Price

$114,995

Mileage

51,484 mi

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Pacific Auto Center - Costa Mesa (33 mi)

Phone: (949) 359-4135
Porsche
Carrera GTS
Color: Yellow
Price

$124,881

Mileage

23,826 mi

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Porsche Ontario (47 mi)

Phone: (951) 552-2201
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