Porsche
911
2019
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2019 porsche 911
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$95,560
MPG
20 city / 29 hwy

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3.5 (Good)

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Based on 2019 Porsche 911 Carrera 2dr Rear-wheel Drive Coupe - MSRP $95,560

2019 Porsche 911 Overview

Anthony Sophinos
Automotive Editor

Expert Rating

3.5 (Good)
MPG
18 City / 26 Highway

Unlike other websites and magazines, our ratings are not based solely on a singular road test, but rather a more encompassing batch of criteria: quality, safety, comfort, performance, fuel economy, reliability history and value. When comparing vehicles using our Rating System, it's important to note that the rating earned by each vehicle correlates only to the models within its class. For example, a compact car cannot be compared to a SUV—They are different vehicles altogether.

You can interpret our ratings in the following way:

5-Star: Outstanding vehicle. Only the most exceptional vehicles achieve this rating.

4-Star: Very Good vehicle. Very good and close to being the best vehicle in its class.

3-Star: Good vehicle. Decent, but not quite the best. Often affordable, but lacking key features found in vehicles of the same class.

2-Star: Below average vehicle. Not recommended, and lacking attributes a car buyer would come to expect for the price.

1-Star: Poor vehicle. Simply does not deserve to be on the road.

There may not a more iconic sports car than the Porsche 911. Its famous teardrop silhouette has remained unbroken through the years, coming to define not only the model, but the brand itself. That continuity can be seen in the eighth generation of Porsche's prima donna, which debuts alongside the full roster of the existing generation.

What's New for 2019

Technically, the 2019 911 (coded 992 in Porsche-speak) is all-new. But these models won't be arriving at dealers until sometime in mid 2019, so Porsche has seen fit to continue offering the receding generation until production of the new version ramps up sufficiently. If the 911 of your dreams needs to be burlier than the Carrera S, plan on buying one soon. Once the old generation (coded 991) is gone, it'll be some time before the 992 spawns any hair-raising models like the current GT3 and GT2 RS.

Speaking of hair-raising, the 991's final salvo looks to be the new GT3 RS. This track-day special runs a naturally-aspirated 4.0-liter flat six and is the third-fastest production car to ever lap Germany's famous Nurburgring circuit.

Porsche 911

Choosing Your Porsche 911

Most cars offer some degree of variety and options when you spec them out. Maybe it's an optional powertrain or two, or perhaps a convertible variant, or possibly some options that allow for a semblance of personalization. The 911 offers all of this and then some. The staggering variety of 911 trims (25 for 2019) and options (innumerable) would impress even the census bureau.

In the venerable 991 generation, the range spans from the humble Carerra to the scintillating GT2 RS. In between, take your pick from the T, S, 4S, Targa, GTS, Turbo, GT3, and GT3 RS. For added confusion, each of these can be further distilled into another layer of nuanced specificity. With the new 992, the model range has yet to grow beyond the Carrera S.

The 992 cars continue the 911's long-standing tradition of using a flat-six engine layout mounted just aft of the rear bumper. As with the 991, this engine displaces 3.0 liters and uses two turbochargers to boost power output, though in this guise it has undergone extensive reengineering in the quest for more power and ability. With new turbos, a redesigned cooling system, and an improved fuel injection process, the engines now make 443 horsepower and 390 pound-feet of torque. All come paired with Porsche's PDK eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission; there's no word yet on whether a manual will eventually return to the lineup.

As for the older 991 cars, all utilize a boxer-style six-cylinder engine. Carrera, T, and Targa models use a 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged version that makes a maximum of 370 hp and 331 lb-ft of torque. S variants make 420 hp and 368 lb-ft of torque. A seven-speed manual transmission comes standard, and the PDK unit is a $3,210 option.

The GTS shares the same displacement and turbo count but has been worked over more thoroughly, raising horsepower count to 450 and dropping zero-to-60 mph times to a scant 3.5 seconds when equipped with the Sport Chrono Package and the PDK transmission. Top speed is an autobahn-ready 193 mph.

Turbo models bump displacement to 3.8 liters, resulting in 540 hp and 523 lb-ft of torque. The primordial GT3 and GT2 RS models upsize the engine to a full 4.0 liters; the GT3 makes do with 500 naturally-aspirated hp while the twin-turbo GT2 RS leaves 700 horses at the command of

the driver's right foot. These machines will rip and snort to 60 mph in 3.2 seconds (GT3) or 2.7 seconds (GT2 RS).

The sheer volume of 911 trim levels and chargeable extras makes an all-encompassing guide an unrealistic proposition; the result would be book-length rather than anything digestible in a sitting. The following information is therefore purposely excluding certain available options. What remains is hopefully that which buyers will find most worthwhile. For further detail, spend a weekend with the Porsche online configurator.

Carrera

The most affordable of the 911 lineup is the Carrera, priced at $92,350 (all prices include the $1,250 destination charge). This amount buys only the plain-Jane Carrera; a little more cash can buy the uplevel Carrera 4, Carrera Targa, Carrera Cabriolet, or Carrera Targa 4 (in the world of Porsche, "4" denotes all-wheel drive). All models are powered by the 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six with 370 hp and 331 lb-ft of torque.

Considering the starting price, one might reasonably expect a lengthy list of standard features. However, things are not reasonable in the realm of Porsche. A no-options Carrera comes with four-way power seats, nine-speaker audio, dual-zone climate control, a navigation system that's embedded within a seven-inch touchscreen infotainment unit, and not much else.

Those looking for more lavish touches will need to consult the intimidatingly extensive options list. Highlights include 14- or 18-way power seats, auto-dimming mirrors, heated and cooled seats, LED lighting, adaptive cruise control, and 12-speaker audio. The Sport Chrono Package is probably the best deal anywhere on the options sheet. It costs $2,090 and bundles launch control, multiple drive modes, an analog and digital chronometer, and a special PSM sport mode that puts a tight leash on the traction and stability control systems.

Carrera S

The S represents the first major step-up in performance from the base Carrera models. A twin-turbo 3.0-liter still provides the motivation, but power is boosted significantly compared to the non-S trims. For the 991 cars, power is rated at 420 horses; the new 992 models boast 443 ponies. Buyers of 991 models can get the S in Targa and Cabriolet variants, either with rear- or all-wheel drive. Prices start at $106,350.

The Carrera S is the only trim the 992 will be available in once it arrives at dealers. Its list of standard features includes a 10.9-inch touchscreen with navigation, a gauge cluster comprised of two seven-inch screens and an analog tachometer, a new wet-road drive mode, cloud services, and staggered 20/21 inch wheels front/rear. Options include the Sport Chrono Package, rear steering, active roll stabilization, and an active-damping suspension. Prices for the next-generation car will begin at $114,550.

As for the carryover cars, standard and optional features closely mirror that of the regular Carrera. The Porsche Torque Vectoring system is the only real additional standard feature. Optionally, there's the $13,770 Powerkit Sport Package, which boosts power to 450 horsepower and includes the Sport Chrono Package, a sport exhaust, rear steering, and a sport steering wheel.

T

A homage to the old Touring trims of yore, the T is the 911 boiled down to the basics – or as close to boiled down as a six-figure car can come. Starting at $103,350, the T only comes as a hardtop coupe with rear-wheel drive. It shares the same powertrain as the base Carrera but adds a number of performance bits as standard, including torque vectoring, Porsche's Active Suspension Management system (PASM), lightweight glass, and the multiple drive modes from the Sport Chrono Package. The T also gets shorter rear gearing for slightly better acceleration, a limited-slip differential, and a sport exhaust.

Comfort and convenience features and options mostly match what's offered on the base Carrera. Other options include full racing-style buckets with rear-seat delete, a Carrera T Interior Package, and rear steering.

GTS

Occupying a sweet spot in the lineup is the GTS. Compared to the more elemental T, the GTS is posher and faster, with more performance-per-dollar than anything else in the range. The same twin-turbo six found in the lower-trim cars is also on duty here, though the engineers sprinkled it with enough fairy dust to bring horsepower up to 450. Prices begin at $121,950 for a RWD hardtop and cap out with the $141,150 Targa 4 and GTS 4 Cabriolet models.

Similar to the T, the GTS comes standard with the most lust-worthy performance bits. Of these, the headliners are the PASM sport suspension, torque vectoring, the full helping of the Sport Chrono goodies, and a sport exhaust system. Slowing the GTS down are drilled and slotted rotors with six-piston calipers up front and four-piston units in the rear; the setup is pulled right from the Turbo's parts bin. All models wear the wider Carrera 4 bodywork and come with a wider track than other Carreras.

The only unique option package is the GTS Interior Package, which costs $4,130 and upholsters much of the interior in Alcantara.

Turbo

With the Turbo, things take a mighty step toward the exotic end of the spectrum. Displacement is increased to 3.8 liters, and the twin turbochargers offer variable turbine geometry technology to eliminate turbo lag. The result is 540 hp in the standard Turbo model. Turbo S models use bigger turbos and more aggressive tuning to net an impressive 580 horses. Turbos only come as all-wheel-drive coupe and Cabriolet models. A Turbo coupe costs $163,050; a Turbo S coupe demands $191,950.

All the performance and chassis technology found on the GTS is standard on the Turbo. Also included here is the PDK transmission, rear-wheel steering, and additional lightweight components. The zero-to-60 mph time checks in at 2.9 second and speed tops out at 198 mph.

The Turbo is the first trim where there's a noticeable upgrade in standard luxury features. Seats are now 14-way power adjustable with memory functionality, a 12-speaker Bose stereo plays the driver's preferred soundtrack, and leather covers more surfaces in the cabin. All exterior lights are now LED, and the GT steering wheel, ambient lighting, and three 12-volt outlets are made standard.

Carbon-ceramic brakes remain optional, as do 18-way power seats, Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control, adaptive cruise control, lane change assist, and heated and ventilated seats.

GT3

The GT3 is the less insane of the two track-bred but road-legal 911s. With a naturally aspirated 4.0-liter flat-six, the GT3 generates 500 hp. It's only available in RWD coupe form, and is priced from $144,850. Some highlights from its spec sheet include dry-sump lubrication, a variable intake manifold, and a sky-high 9,000 redline. The PDK transmission comes standard but a six-speed manual is a no-cost, special-order option.

The new RS variant of the GT3 comes with an even bigger rear wing, makes more downforce, and generates 520 hp. It's the most blistering way to get around any road course and starts at $188,750.

Standard comfort features include four-way power seats with more aggressive bolstering, GT3-specific trim and embroidery, an Alcantara-wrapped shifter and steering wheel, and wheel-mounted paddle shifters.

The optional, no-cost Touring Package replaces the large rear spoiler with a much subtler active aero lip. It also upholsters the interior in leather rather than Alcantara and adorns the cabin with extra Porsche crests and brushed aluminium trim.

GT3 RS

The most powerful road-going 911 ever is the $294,450 GT2 RS. The same 3.8-liter motor from the Turbo is used here but generates a whopping 700 hp. It's enough to bring zero-to-60 in 2.7 seconds while allowing a 211 mph top speed.

Standard performance features come right from the racetrack. There's magnesium body parts, lightweight glass, and ceramic-composite brakes. Inside, red and black two-tone abides, covering the exclusive steering wheel and seats. The full roster of connectivity and infotainment remains.

For the most ardent weight watchers, the $38,000 Wiessach Package strips out air conditioning and extensively uses carbon fiber and other lightweight materials throughout the car. The result is a curb weight 40 pounds lighter than a standard GT2 RS.

CarsDirect Tip

There's enough options and choices here to make even Porsche fans dizzy. The best way to narrow down what you want from the 2019 Porsche 911 is to first consider your budget and body style, and then perhaps whether you want rear- or all-wheel drive. These broader selections will make it much easier to determine which model is right for you.

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