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2021 Porsche 911

Porsche 911 OEM Exterior Primary Photo
OEM Interior Primary
OEM Exterior Standard
OEM Exterior Standard
OEM Interior
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Used Car Price Range
$113,999 - $251,750
$113,999 $251,750
Select a Trim
Select a Trim
2021 Carrera 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe
most popular
Price:   -  From $99,200
2021 Carrera 4 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $106,500
2021 Carrera 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $112,000
2021 Carrera S 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $115,100
2021 Carrera 4 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $119,300
2021 Targa 4 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $119,300
2021 Carrera 4S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $122,400
2021 Carrera S 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $127,900
2021 Carrera 4S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $135,200
2021 Targa 4S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $135,200
2021 Turbo 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $170,800
2021 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $180,600
2021 Turbo 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $183,600
2021 Turbo S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Coupe Price:   -  From $203,500
2021 Turbo S 2dr All-Wheel Drive Cabriolet Price:   -  From $216,300
Expert Rating
3.6 (Good)

Our expert ratings are based on seven comprehensive criteria: quality, safety, comfort, performance, fuel economy, reliability history and value.

You can interpret our ratings in the following way:

: Outstanding vehicle. Only the most exceptional vehicles achieve this rating.

: Very Good vehicle. Very good and close to being the best vehicle in its class.

: Good vehicle. Decent, but not quite the best. Often affordable, but lacking key features found in vehicles of the same class.

: Below average vehicle. Not recommended, and lacking attributes a car buyer would come to expect for the price.

: Poor vehicle. Simply does not deserve to be on the road.

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Overview

What's New

The big news for the 2021 Porsche 911 is the return of the Targa and Turbo variants. The Targa brings classic roofless style to the latest 911 generation, while the Turbo brings tremendous speed. The humble Carrera benefits from the new arrivals, gaining new options like acoustic glass and a more sophisticated adaptive cruise control system.

This generation of 911 (codenamed 992 in Porsche nomenclature) debuted only last year. We don’t see any major mechanical changes on the horizon.

Choosing Your Porsche 911

With the return of the Targa and Turbo, the latest Porsche 911 comes in a dizzying eight trims: Carrera, Carrera S, Targa, Carrera GTS, Targa S, Targa GTS, Turbo, and Turbo S.

Carrera and Turbo trims can be ordered as convertibles, with the Targa trims as a stylish roofless alternative. Confused yet?

Pricing is less complicated – the 911 is expensive no matter how you slice it. Starting prices range from $100,550 including destination for a base Carrera to $204,850 for a Turbo S.

Engine Choices

No matter what 911 you choose, a flat-six engine sits behind the rear wheels. Most models use a 3.0-liter engine, with power output dictated by trim. S and GTS models get progressively more power, although Porsche hasn’t released official numbers for the incoming GTS. Turbo trims use their own 3.8-liter mill. Again, the Turbo S gets a higher tune.

Engine TypeHorsepowerTorqueFuel Economy (Combined)
3.0L Twin-Turbo 6-Cylinder379 hp331 lb-ft20 mpg
3.0L Twin-Turbo 6-Cylinder443 hp390 lb-ft20 mpg
3.0L Twin-Turbo 6-CylinderNot Yet RatedNot Yet RatedNot Yet Rated
3.8L Twin-Turbo 6-Cylinder572 hp553 lb-ftNot Yet Rated
3.8L Twin-Turbo 6-Cylinder640 hp590 lb-ftNot Yet Rated

Porsche’s benchmark eight-speed dual-clutch PDK automatic transmission is the default. Carrera S and Targa 4S trims have a seven-speed manual as a no-cost option.

All-wheel drive is standard on Targa and Turbo models, and optional on Carreras, which get standard rear-wheel drive.

Passenger and Cargo Capacity

The Porsche 911 is classified as a four-seater, but don’t let that fool you. The rear seats aren't friendly to adults and are best reserved for children and cargo.

You’ll need the space, because the 911’s "frunk," or front trunk, holds only 4.6 cubic feet of luggage. In coupe models, rear seats fold down to provide a little extra versatility.

Porsche 911

Safety Features

The 911 has improved over the last decade and now offers competitive safety tech. Automatic emergency braking, forward collision warning, and front and rear parking sensors come standard. For 2021, PDK-equipped cars can add a more sophisticated InnoDrive cruise control.

Blind-spot monitoring ($1,060), lane keeping assist ($1,220), adaptive cruise control ($2,000), a surround-view camera system ($1,430), and night vision assist ($2,540) are on the options list.

Connectivity

The 911 doesn’t skimp on infotainment, which we’d expect in a car costing six figures. A 10.9-inch infotainment screen fills the dash on every model, with navigation, Apple CarPlay compatibility, and satellite readio baked in. Sadly, Android Auto didn’t make the cut. The system is wi-fi compatible and there are two front USB ports.

On the options list, you'll find a Bose surround-sound audio system ($1,600) and a Burmester surround-sound audio system ($5,560).

Porsche 911

Carrera - From $100,550

The Carrera may be the base model, but don’t underestimate it. 0-60 takes four seconds flat. The gauge cluster is now largely digital, but the tach still runs to its 7,500 rpm red line on an analog dial.

The 911 doesn’t skimp on interior luxury. Dual-zone automatic climate control, heated front seats, partial leather upholstery, and Porsche’s app-based Connect system all come standard. The exterior keeps the classic 911 shape, with LED headlights and staggered wheels measuring 19 inches up front and 20 in the rear.

Porsche’s options list is long, elaborate, and expensive.

Power sport seats with memory settings are $2,330 that most owners will spend. The Premium Package is another popular addition, with Bose speakers, ventilated front seats, a surround-view camera, and blind-spot monitoring for $5,350.

Performance enthusiasts will want the Sport Chrono Package ($2,790), which drops 0.2 seconds off the 0-60 sprint thanks to launch control. Also included are additional driving modes, a dash-mounted chronograph, and tire temperature readouts.

Individual options are too exhaustive to list, but highlights include: an electric sunroof ($1,560), power-folding side mirrors ($370), automatic cornering headlights ($1,270), and leather sport seats ($810).

Carrera S - From $116,450

Aside from the various roof styles, most 911 models have identical interiors. The extra money commanded by the Carrera S goes almost entirely into the engine, which adds 73 hp over the base Carrera. 0-60 time drops to 3.5 seconds, or 3.4 in a 4S. S models and above upgrade to 20/21-inch wheels.

The Carrera S does unlock new mechanical options. A seven-speed manual transmission is a no-cost option, and rear-axle steering adds $2,090. For another $1,020, Porsche will lower the ride by 10 mm for a sport suspension with active damping.

Targa 4 - From $120,650

Although the Targa functions as its own model within the 911 lineup, it’s essentially a cross between the coupe and cabriolet. The rear pillars remain in place, but the roof between the headrests and the windshield stows away. Aside from looks, the main difference between the cabriolet and the Targa is that the Targa needs to be stopped to stow its roof.

The Targa comes with standard all-wheel drive. Otherwise, trim and options are the same as the Carrera.

Carrera GTS - From $122,050

Details are hazy on the new Carrera GTS, which should land sometime this year. The car will almost certainly use the same engine as the Carrera and Carrera S, but tuned for even more power. Expect extra performance goodies as well, especially those made for track days. Past GTS models have started with rear-wheel drive and provided options for both manual and automatic transmissions.

Targa 4S - From $136,550

Where the Carrera 4S goes, so goes the Targa 4S. This trim is also available with either a manual or an automatic, and comes with the same sporty options.

Targa 4 GTS - From $141,250

Like the Carrera GTS, the Targa 4 GTS awaits official confirmation of features and options. Most of the price difference goes into the roof mechanism, so we expect trim to match the Carrera here as well.

Turbo - From $172,150

The Turbo is a major step up in the 911 range, bringing prodigious horsepower and a blistering 0-60 time of 2.7 seconds. Standard all-wheel drive helps put all that power down to pavement.

The Turbo is fractionally longer, wider, and taller than lower trims, but the interior is similar. Full leather upholstery is standard, as are power sport seats, with unique Turbo badging that extends to the tachometer.

Features from the Sport Chrono Package are included, although an active sport suspension remains a $1,510 option. Somewhat disappointingly, the best active safety tech remains on the options list as well.

Turbo S - From $204,850

As the king of the 911 lineup, the Turbo S unlocks all 640 horsepower from the flat-six engine. 0-60 times drop by another tenth, the quarter mile falls in 10.5 seconds, and top speed pushes north of 200 mph.

Adaptive 18-way sport seats come standard, but, otherwise, the Turbo S looks just like the Turbo. If you really want to max out the configurator, turning either Turbo trim into a convertible costs another $12,800.

Compare 911 Trims Side-By-Side

CarsDirect Tip

The 2021 Porsche 911 is sublime in every trim, but we like it best at the edges of the range. The base Carrera is a decent value and has more than enough oomph for our taste. When you’re done being practical, Turbo trims are a study in glorious excess.

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Automotive Editor
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Expert Review

Pros
  • All-star engines
  • Classic shape
  • Elegant, top-notch interior
  • Endlessly customizable
Cons
  • Endlessly customizable
  • Price of some options
  • Is it possible to be too perfect?
Expert Rating
3.6 (Good)

Our expert ratings are based on seven comprehensive criteria: quality, safety, comfort, performance, fuel economy, reliability history and value.

You can interpret our ratings in the following way:

: Outstanding vehicle. Only the most exceptional vehicles achieve this rating.

: Very Good vehicle. Very good and close to being the best vehicle in its class.

: Good vehicle. Decent, but not quite the best. Often affordable, but lacking key features found in vehicles of the same class.

: Below average vehicle. Not recommended, and lacking attributes a car buyer would come to expect for the price.

: Poor vehicle. Simply does not deserve to be on the road.

author image
Automotive Editor

An icon still in the making. What makes a car - or any product, for that matter - iconic? Many nameplates get their credit, such as the longstanding Toyota Camry, but to take up the status of an icon is a much rarer achievement. Most venerable models are respected, but a precious few are properly venerated.

If any car could give a master class on this topic, it's the Porsche 911. Its shape, its name, its performance - all of it comes together in those three iconic digits. The Porsche 911 is more than just Porsche: it has become the final word in upscale European sports cars. Some are faster, some are pricier, some are rarer, but none have the ethos of a 911.

New boss, meet the old boss. Now two years into the most recent generation, the 911 continues to mature. As usual, Porsche lets new models trickle out on what feels like an annual basis; this year, we got the Targa, the Turbo, and the GT3, the latter a barely-disguised track rat that snorts apexes and doles out 9,000-rpm dopamine hits.

Other things stay blissfully the same, such as the iconic teardrop shape. In the last sixty years, that shape has become the bedrock of Porsche lore and lust. To our eyes, it's still as classic and attractive as ever. It's as timeless as the timepieces worn by the usual Porsche clientele.

The 911 is offered in multiple body styles, from the classic hardtop to the half-roof Targa to the full-bore convertible. Our choice remains the convertible or Targa. Why turn down the open-air experience, especially when these versions give up nothing to the hardtop, despite their additional weight and complexity?

Porsche 911

Performance, perfected. It is easy to wax poetic about 911 performance, because the Porsche engineers have essentially perfected the performance of a rear-engined sports car. All models are unflappable, stoic, deathly fast, and astonishingly competent at handling any sort of driving situation short of off-roading.

Those elements make it easy to recommend the base 911 and its twin-turbo 3.0-liter flat-six, but our preferences run toward the high-output version of that engine found in S. Why? While the base model has 379 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque - enough to merit a 0-60 mph run of under four seconds - moving into the high-output S revises those figures to 443 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque. With the Sport Chrono package, 0-60 mph falls under three seconds. That sort of speed at that price point (the S costs about $120,000 to start) almost makes the S look like a bargain.

The extra oomph alone helps justify the higher price of the S, but there's another treasure to be had here: an available seven-speed manual. Other 911s save the GT3 only come with the eight-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic transmission. That's a stellar gearbox, but it can't beat the joy that comes with a real clutch pedal. That stick shift underscores the S as the enthusiast choice. As expected, it is magic to work quickly on a fun backroad, even if the long gear ratios and ample power don't necessitate constant shifting.

At the top stand the Turbo and GT3 models. The Turbos have been civilized as of the last 10 or 15 years; the 2021 Turbo is all hushed power delivered in obscenely quick increments. It is fast, posh, and drama-free - almost too much so, to be frank. We wish it had more character.

That's where the GT3 comes in. This screamer sports a 4.0-liter flat-six that eschews the turbo for old-fashioned, high-rpm power delivery. It makes its music all the way through 9,000 rpm, and you conduct the symphony with either the eight-speed PDK or the seven-speed manual as your baton. We recommend the latter, of course; how you could you pass on the chance to shift such a marvel of an engine yourself?

All other performance parameters are on point. The ride is supple when you want or firmed up with a quick change of the drive mode. The brakes haul down the 911 without complaint. The steering, while maybe not as great as the old, more analog models, is still communicative. All in all, the 911 is a driver's car in every way.

Options, options, options. Oh, and before we forget - yes, the 911 remains available with a zillion options. Few cars offer the level of customization of a 911. If you think it would be hard to turn a $100,000 911 into one costing twice that, think again.

If you want to keep costs to a minimum when ordering up your dream 911, we suggest you start with the Sport Chrono package, which is standard on the Turbo and optional elsewhere. For about $2,800, it includes launch control, magnetic engine mounts for better dampening of driveline vibrations, additional drive modes, and an app that allows for comprehensive data recording during lapping events. The party piece, of course, is the analog chronometer atop the dash.

From there, we'd add the $5,350 Premium Package, which includes safety gear that should - but doesn't - come standard, including a surround-view camera and lane-change assist. It also brings ventilated front seats and Bose audio.

Our favorite a la carte options include the $2,000 adaptive cruise control and $2,300 14-way sport seats. There are other tempting options, but with these you get a well-equipped, track-ready 911 for less than $15,000 over the base price - in the world of Porsche, that's a bargain.

The rest of the options list ranges from questionably expensive to outright absurd. Examples of said absurdity include the $17,000 leather treatment that mimics the 1975 Porsche 930 interior pattern and the $15,000 interior option that comes with corduroy seat inserts. You can also spend thousands changing the colors of your seat belts, brake calipers, and even the key fob. You'll need to keep a tight hold on your wallet before venturing into the 911 build configurator.

Final thoughts. Porsche's constant refinement of a classic formula has led to the 2021 911 as being one of the greats, a lineup that more than lives up to its lofty heritage. If there's any complaints, it's that the 911 is now too good - the drama has been tempered, the once-unpredictable back end has been tamed, the speed is so natural that doing triple digits is a non-event. The 911 is almost too reserved for its own good.

Otherwise, this iconic sports car sets the bar. While the rest of the world still tries to build a 911 beater, Porsche will continue to rule the roost.

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Specs & Features

Highlights
Overall Crash Safety Rating
Not Available
Engine - Cylinders/Horsepower/Torque
3.0L H-6 / 379 HP / 331 ft.lbs.
Transmission
Standard: 8-spd sequential shift control auto-shift man w/OD
Drive Type
Rear-wheel
Fuel Economy - City/Highway/Combined
18 / 24 / 21 Mpg
Passenger Capacity
4
Bumper to Bumper Warranty
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Mechanical Specs
Engine - Cylinders/Horsepower/Torque
3.0L H-6 / 379 HP / 331 ft.lbs.
Drive Type
Rear-wheel
Fuel Economy - City/Hwy/Combined
18 / 24 / 21 Mpg
Brakes
4-wheel Disc
Front Suspension
Strut
Rear Suspension
Independent Multi-link
Spare Tire And Wheel
Fuel Tank
16.9 Gal. / 23.7 Gal.
Recommended Fuel Type
Premium Unleaded
Average Cost To Fill Tank
$65
Dimensions & Capabilities
Maximum Cargo Volume
Passenger Volume
Exterior Length
177.9 "
Exterior Width
72.9 "
Exterior Height
51.1 "
Front Headroom
Rear Headroom
Front Legroom
Rear Legroom
Front Shoulder Room
Rear Shoulder Room
Front Hip Room
Rear Hip Room
Curb Weight
3,354 Lbs.
Wheel Base
97 "
Turning Radius
18.4 '
Exterior Features
Door Count
2 Doors
Wheels
Paint
Clearcoat Monotone / Clearcoat Monotone With Stripe / Metallic Monotone
Exterior Mirrors
Dual Power Remote Heated
Bumpers
Body-colored / Front Body-colored
Grille Moldings
Rear Spoiler
Power
Exhaust
Dual Stainless Steel With Polished Tailpipe Finish / Dual Stainless Steel With Chrome Tailpipe Finish / Dual Stainless Steel With Black Tailpipe Finish
Interior Features
Seating
Passenger Capacity
4
Seat Trim
Leather / Leather/sport-tex Cloth/leather
Front Seat Type
Sport Bucket
Heated Front Seats
Driver And Front Passenger Heated-cushion, Heated-seatback
Front Driver Seat Direction Controls
6-way (4-way Power) / (10-way Power) / (12-way Power)
Front Passenger Seat Direction Controls
6-way (4-way Power) / (10-way Power) / (12-way Power)
Front Armrests
6-way (4-way Power) / (10-way Power) / (12-way Power)
Rear Armrests
Rear Seats
50-50 Bucket
Radio & Infotainment
Radio
Siriusxm Fm/hd/satellite, Fm/hd/satellite, Seek-scan
Speakers
8 / 13 Burmester 3d High-end Surround Sound / 12 Bose
Radio Steering Wheel Controls
Apple Car Play
Android Auto
Bluetooth w/ Hands-Free Connectivity
Convenience Features
Steering Wheel Type
Telescopic Tilt Style / Power Telescopic Tilt Style
Climate Control
Automatic Air Conditioning
Cruise Control
Sun Roof
Express Open/close
Rearview Mirror
Auto-dimming Day-night
One Touch Open Window
Driver And Passenger
Tinted Windows
Light
Vanity Mirrors
Dual Illuminated
Remote Keyless Entry
Keyfob (all Doors)
Power Outlets
1
Safety Features
Overall Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Overall Front Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Overall Side Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Rollover Crash Safety Rating
Not Yet Available
Front Impact Airbags
Driver And Passenger
Driver Side Impact Airbags
Posip Seat Mounted
Knee Airbag
Passenger Side Impact Airbag
Posip Seat Mounted
Rear Side Airbag
Seatbelt Pretensioners
Front
Anti-Lock Brakes
4-wheel Anti-lock Brakes (abs)
Forward Collision Warning
Warn And Brake Assist Forward Collision Mitigation
Blind Spot Sensor
Lane Change Assist (lca) Blind Spot
Lane Departure Warning
Lane Keep Assist (lka) Lane Departure
Autonomous Cruise Control
Hands-on Steering Assist
Pedestrian Detection
Warn And Brake Assist Front Pedestrian Detection Prevention
Driver Attention Alert
Daytime Running Lights
Auto High Beams
Variable Distance Auto High-beam
Adaptive Headlights
Porsche Dynamic Light System (pdls) Directionally Adaptive
Parking Sensors
Parkassist Front And Rear
Security Systems
Security System
Panic Alarm
Ignition Disable
Immobilizer
Warranty
Bumper To Bumper Months Miles
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Major Components Months
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Included Maintenance Months
12 Months / 10,000 Miles
Roadside Assistance Months
48 Months / 50,000 Miles
Corrosion Perforation
144 Months / Unlimited Miles
Accessories Months
24 Months / Unlimited Miles

Used 2021 Porsche 911 for Sale

22 vehicles found within 50 miles of your area
Porsche
Carrera 2dr Rear-Wheel Drive Coupe
Color: Blue
Price

$113,999

Mileage

28,971 mi

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Porsche Downtown LA (10 mi)

Phone: (323) 285-2759
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Carrera
Color: Agate Grey Metallic
Price

$118,500

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Porsche Newport Beach (37 mi)

Phone: (888) 208-7670
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Carrera
Color: Blue
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Eurocar Inc. (35 mi)

Phone: (949) 722-7121
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Color: Red
Price

$121,999

Mileage

8,896 mi

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Porsche Downtown LA (11 mi)

Phone: (213) 222-1295
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