2018 Chevy Traverse High Country Priced From $52,995

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Senior Pricing Analyst

Alex Bernstein is the Senior Pricing Analyst for CarsDirect.com. Each month he studies immense volumes of pricing and incentives data in search of trends that are useful to car shoppers. In the process, he often breaks industry news stories -- his analyses and insights have been featured on websites such as Automotive News, The Detroit News, Autoblog, The Truth About Cars and The Car Connection.

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, Senior Pricing Analyst - June 30, 2017

When it goes on sale this fall, the 2018 Chevy Traverse High Country will be one of the most expensive SUVs in its class. That's according to recent order guides that put its price at a rather eye-watering $52,995 with destination.

So how does this compare to the previous year? How expensive is it compared to other models in its segment? And what kinds of features will you get for the money?

Here's what you need to know.

New Kind of High

The new Traverse High Country will be $4,700 more expensive than the next-highest trim, the $48,295 Premier with all-wheel drive. Next to the previous year, the vehicle is on a completely different level.

At the moment, the priciest Traverse that you can buy is the $44,940 Premier with all-wheel drive. The High Country comes in $8,055 higher than that — literally a new high for this model.

Key differences when opting for the High Country include a unique Loft Brown leather interior, 20-inch polished wheels, ventilated front seats with heated rear outboard seats, a dual-pane sunroof, wireless device charging, a power folding 3rd row, hands-free power liftgate, LED headlamps and a unique twin-clutch AWD system.

Safety is also an area in which the High Country has an advantage over other versions. Although low-speed automatic emergency braking is standard on the Premier with all-wheel drive, the High Country is the only version with the latest front automatic braking system with collision avoidance braking.

Near The Top

First introduced in 2013 with the Silverado pickup, the High Country was meant to offer "rugged luxury" and a premium flavor akin to the GMC Denali. But are shoppers ready to pay $52,995 for a Traverse? GM seems to think so, and there are already some pricey competitors.

At the top, the Ford Explorer Platinum 4x4 is currently the most expensive non-luxury SUV in this class, ringing in at $54,180. That's bordering on luxury territory. In base form, an Audi Q7 3.0T starts at $56,450 while the BMW X5 starts at $57,595. However, prices can skyrocket once you start adding options and additional tech.

But will SUV shoppers be willing to pay GM's price? We suspect so, especially once we start to see financing and lease promotions. After all, there's already a slew of top-spec models available with names like Platinum, Elite, Signature and Limited Ultimate.

Here's a quick look at what the Traverse is up against.

Vehicle Name Engine Passenger Capacity MSRP
Ford Explorer Platinum 365 hp V6 Up to 7 $54,180
Chevy Traverse High Country (2018) 305 hp V6 7 $52,995
VW Atlas SEL Premium 276 hp V6 Up to 7 $49,415
Dodge Durango R/T w/Tech, Moonroof 360 hp V8 Up to 7 $49,280
Honda Pilot Elite 280 hp V6 7 $48,160
Toyota Highlander Platinum 295 hp V6 Up to 8 $47,220
Mazda CX-9 Signature 227 hp 4-cyl turbo 7 $45,255
Chevy Traverse Premier (2017) 288 hp V6 7 $44,940
Hyundai Santa Fe Limited Ultimate 290 hp V6 6 $44,200

Note: Prices reflect 2017 all-wheel drive models with optional safety gear

, Senior Pricing Analyst

Alex Bernstein is the Senior Pricing Analyst for CarsDirect.com. Each month he studies immense volumes of pricing and incentives data in search of trends that are useful to car shoppers. In the process, he often breaks industry news stories -- his analyses and insights have been featured on websites such as Automotive News, The Detroit News, Autoblog, The Truth About Cars and The Car Connection.

Follow On: Google+ | Website