2019 Ford Fusion Prices Increasing Up To $6,190

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Senior Pricing Analyst

Alex Bernstein is the Senior Pricing Analyst for CarsDirect.com. Each month he studies immense volumes of pricing and incentives data in search of trends that are useful to car shoppers. In the process, he often breaks industry news stories -- his analyses and insights have been featured on websites such as Automotive News, The Detroit News, Autoblog, The Truth About Cars and The Car Connection.

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, Senior Pricing Analyst - May 30, 2018

News about the Ford Fusion has been a bit like a roller coaster. First, we learned the automaker was going to make automatic emergency braking standard for 2019. Then, we learned the brand plans to kill the model by 2020.

Now, manufacturer order guides reveal the 2019 Fusion will be quite a bit more expensive than it was before. In fact, our analysis shows certain styles will cost as much as $6,190 more than the previous year.

Here's a look at why that's the case.

Pricing Change-Up

For 2019, Ford is simplifying trim choices for the Fusion in an effort to reduce complexity. However, since the strategy involves bundling more equipment than before, MSRPs are going up.

The 2019 Fusion S will start at $23,735 including destination, $645 more than the previous year. The more popular SE is up $650 and will now start at $25,015. Higher trims are seeing more drastic changes.

The updated Fusion Titanium is listed at $35,235, which equates to a $3,870 price increase. The range-topping Fusion Sport will be subject to the largest increase of $6,190 and will start at $40,910.

The fuel-efficient Fusion Hybrid and Fusion Energi won't escape increases as well.

The Hybrid will now have a base price of $28,450, up from $26,265. Here, the difference lies in the fact that the entry-level S trim has been discontinued and the least-expensive style is now the SE. Having said that, the SE is still $1,235 more expensive than the previous year's MSRP of $27,215.

The Energi Plug-in, which benefits from a boost in EV range to 25 miles, now starts at $37,490. This is largely due to the fact that the car is now only available in a single Titanium trim. Compared to the previous year, the MSRP for this style is up $2,215. As a result, the car will be just $5 less than the Chevy Bolt EV.

Why The Changes?

The biggest difference for the Fusion compared to the previous year is the addition of Ford Co-Pilot360. The new system includes automatic emergency braking, blind spot warning, lane-keeping, a backup camera and auto high beams.

For a little over $600, entry-level styles could be a compelling value. Aside from not having to add pricey safety packages, there's also the fact that the 1.5-liter turbo engine (previously a $400 upgrade), is now standard in the SE.

Yes, higher trims may seem more expensive, but they also come with a lot more gear.

For example, the 2019 Fusion Titanium starts at $35,235, but now comes with a moonroof, adaptive cruise, nav and 19-inch wheels. A similarly-equipped 2018 Fusion carries a list price approaching $37,000.

Similarly, the new Fusion Sport starts at $40,910 but will come with features that used to drive the price over $43,000. These include nav, moonroof, parking sensors, cooled seats, adaptive cruise, rear inflatable seat belts and more.

At the lower end, the Fusion will undercut the Toyota Camry LE with Blind Spot Monitor, which has an MSRP of $26,145. It's also less than the $28,365 Accord EX, the least-expensive Accord that has blind spot monitoring.

Shoppers not looking for the latest & greatest may want to consider a 2018 model. Here in Los Angeles, the 2018 Fusion Hybrid is eligible for 0% financing for 72 months plus $3,000 cash, making it one of the best deals on a hybrid.

Learn more about the Fusion Hybrid »

, Senior Pricing Analyst

Alex Bernstein is the Senior Pricing Analyst for CarsDirect.com. Each month he studies immense volumes of pricing and incentives data in search of trends that are useful to car shoppers. In the process, he often breaks industry news stories -- his analyses and insights have been featured on websites such as Automotive News, The Detroit News, Autoblog, The Truth About Cars and The Car Connection.

Follow On: Google+ | Website