2019 Hyundai Tucson Now The Cheapest Compact SUV With AEB

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - October 26, 2018

Hyundai recently announced all of the changes it made to the 2019 Tucson and the South Korean automaker's compact SUV is now the most affordable option in the segment with automatic emergency braking (AEB).

Pricing for the Tucson starts at $24,245, which includes the $1,045 destination fee. For the 2019 model year, Hyundai has expanded the Tucson's list of standard safety features, adding forward collision-avoidance assist, lane keep assist, and driver attention warning as standard throughout the entire lineup. The additions make the Tucson the most affordable compact SUV to have AEB.

Mazda sells the CX-5 with Smart City Brake Support, a low-speed AEB system, but that costs $25,145. The Toyota RAV-4 comes with Toyota's Safety Sense P system, which comes with a pre-collision system as standard, but that's priced at $25,705. The Honda CR-V is offered with the automaker's suite of safety features, called Honda Sensing, but that's on the EX trim and above, which costs $28,045.

Lastly, Kia changed things for the 2019 Sportage, making it more expensive than the new Tucson if you want AEB. Instead of offering the feature as part of the technology package on the base LX trim, like last year, the option has been deleted on the entry-level model. So, if you want AEB on a Sportage, you'll have to move up to the mid-level EX. With the right boxes ticked, prices for the Sportage can swell to $32,195 if you want AEB.

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter | Website