2021 Mazda3 Turbo Fuel Efficiency Just 1 MPG Less Than Non-Turbo Model

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - October 20, 2020

The 2021 Mazda3 Turbo is just one of the many vehicles the automaker plans to turbocharge in the near future. Over the standard 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, the newly available turbocharged 2.5-liter engine brings an additional 64 horsepower and all-wheel drive as standard. Despite the extra power, consumers are, in certain circumstances, only looking at a 1 mpg drop in fuel economy.

The EPA has released its official fuel economy figures for the Mazda3 Turbo. Sedan body styles are rated to get up to 27 mpg combined, while hatchbacks have a 26 mpg combined rating. Those figures are on regular fuel, which, when used, decreases power. On regular fuel, the turbocharged engine makes 227 hp and 310 lb-ft of torque. Using premium fuel boosts power figures to 250 hp and 320 lb-ft of torque. Regardless of fuel, those figures are relatively high for the lineup.

The most efficient Mazda3 for 2021 is the 2.0 Sedan, which comes with a newly available 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. Power is rated at 155 hp, while the engine carries a 31 mpg combined rating. The 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine is the next step up and is standard on the hatchback body. With front-wheel drive, the 186-hp 2.5-liter four-cylinder is rated at 30 mpg combined in the sedan and 29 mpg combined in the hatchback. All-wheel drive is available for the 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and brings fuel economy down to 28 mpg combined (sedan) and 27 mpg combined (hatchback).

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With 250 hp, we thought the turbocharged models would have worse fuel economy figures. Unless you compare the turbocharged engine with the base 2.0-liter four-cylinder, it’s almost a negligible difference between the two 2.5-liter four-cylinder engines. The main difference between the two comes in pricing.

The Mazda3 2.5 Turbo AWD Sedan starts at $30,845. The Select trim with AWD costs $25,045, which is $5,800 more affordable. Prices for the hatchback are a little higher, as the 2.5 Turbo AWD Hatchback costs $31,845 with the Select AWD Hatchback starting at $26,045, but the difference is still $5,800. While you won’t notice a major difference with the turbocharged engines at the pumps – as long as you use regular fuel – you’ll certainly see a large difference in the initial purchase.

With up to 250 hp, the Mazda3 Turbo models don’t really face any direct competition in the class. While the Mazda3 Turbo isn’t in the same league as the Hyundai Veloster N, Honda Civic Type R, and Volkswagen Golf GTI when it comes to performance, it has a similar amount of power. Those competitors, though, aren’t as efficient, as the Veloster N has a 25-mpg combined rating, Civic Type R is rated at 25 mpg combined, and the GTI gets 27 mpg combined. All of those hatchbacks come with turbocharged engines, but only the Civic Type R requires premium fuel.

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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