Chevy Reveals 2020 Corvette Convertible

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - October 8, 2019

Warm weather hasn’t even made way for fall yet, but Chevrolet already wants you to start thinking about next spring. What happens in spring? Winter cedes to warm weather, flowers sprout, trees get their leaves, and the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible will arrive in dealerships. Not only is it the first time the Corvette utilizes a mid-engine layout, but it’s also the first time the convertible model will get a power-folding hardtop roof. It’s also quite a bit more than the coupe, demanding an extra $7,500.

Prior generations of the Corvette Convertible all came with soft-top roofs, but that changes for the all-new C8 generation. The move to a hardtop roof will help the Corvette’s progression upstream. Chevrolet claims the hardtop roof results in a more serene cabin, improved security, and a “cleaner” look compared to older Corvette Convertibles with the soft top. For what it’s worth, the automaker claims that the 2020 Corvette was designed as a convertible from the get-go.

Performance hasn’t taken a drastic hit, either. When spec’d with the same rear spoiler that’s found on the coupe’s Z51 Performance Package, the convertible has the same drag coefficient as the coupe. Chevrolet also updated the convertible’s springs and dampers to ensure that the convertible has nearly the same performance as the coupe around corners.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible

The hardtop itself has a two-piece design and can be operated at speeds of up to 30 mph. It only takes 16 seconds to retract into the tonneau cover. Unlike previous Corvette Convertibles that had hydraulic systems, the C8 Corvette Convertible uses six electric motors. Chevrolet claims the change was made in the name of reliability.

Looks wise, the convertible doesn’t stray too far away from the coupe’s design, which makes sense if the sports car was envisioned as a convertible from the beginning. Convertible models, though, do come with two large nacelles that help reduce the amount of air that comes into the cabin. They also help give the side profile of the convertible a slightly more exotic look than the coupe. A power-adjustable glass window sits directly behind the seats and also helps with wind noise. Lastly, the convertible has a flat deck that covers the engine in its entirety – there’s no way to look into the engine compartment like with the coupe.

In an impressive feat of engineering, Chevrolet’s engineers managed to maintain roughly the same amount of cargo space as the coupe. So even with the top down, the Corvette Convertible will be able to hold two sets of golf clubs in the back. The frunk has the same amount of cargo capacity, too.

Power will still come from a 6.2-liter V8 that makes 495 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque (with the available performance exhaust system). Shifts are handled through an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic.

When it comes to pricing, the base Corvette Convertible will cost $7,500 more than the coupe. With a Corvette 1LT starting at $59,995 including destination, that would put a similarly equipped Corvette Convertible at $67,495. Moving to a convertible is more expensive than before, as the 2019 model year only required an extra $4,500 to get into a soft top. Production of the convertible is set to begin toward the end of 2019, with deliveries starting at the end of the first quarter of 2020.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible

Learn more about the Corvette »

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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