GM Cars Much Safer With Automatic Braking: IIHS

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - November 14, 2018

Advances in technology have made cars safer than ever. While the latest crop of high-tech safety features, like forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking, are driving new car prices to all-time highs, they're offering drivers and passengers with a safer way to get around than before.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) conducted a study that compared vehicles from General Motors that were fitted with optional front crash prevention systems, which include automatic emergency braking and forward collision warning, to vehicles that didn't have them.

According to the institute's study, GM vehicles that had both of the optional safety features had 43 percent fewer police-reported front-to-rear crashes – where one vehicle rear-ends another – than a comparable vehicle without the technology. The IIHS also accounts for incidents where someone was injured. In those instances, vehicles with the technology accounted for 64 percent fewer front-to-rear crashes.

That's a clear distinction between the two. But even having one feature, forward collision warning, helped drivers in one of GM's vehicles avoid a front-to-rear crash. Compared to vehicles that didn't have the feature, vehicles that were equipped with forward collision warning were in 17 percent fewer front-to-rear crashes and 30 percent fewer crashes with injuries.

It's not just GM cars that are safer, as the IIHS also conducted a similar study with vehicles from Mercedes-Benz, Honda, Acura, FCA, Volvo, and Subaru. In that study, the institute found that vehicles from the respective brands with both technology features reduced front-to-rear crashes by 50 percent.

Automatic  braking

Obviously, forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking are meant to reduce the severity – and in some cases – the likelihood of a front-to-rear crash. To gather its data, the IIHS combed through front-to-rear crashes in 23 states that were reported to the police by VINs for GM vehicles from 2013 to 2015.

As IIHS' study reveals, automatic emergency braking and forward collision warning helped reduce the amount of front-to-rear crashes in some of GM's cars across the country. While the tech is optional on the automaker's vehicles, and a lot of other brands's cars, automakers have agreed to add the tech as standard on all new passenger cars by the end of 2022. That's good news, as it clearly works.

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter | Website

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