EPA May Lower EV Targets After Industry Pushback

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - March 20, 2024
2024 Ford F-150 Lightning

In 2023, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its strictest vehicle emissions ever for light-duty and medium-duty vehicles starting with the 2027 model year. The proposal would force automakers to sell more electric vehicles, calling for 67% of new light-duty and 46% of medium-duty vehicle sales to come from EVs by 2032. According to a report from Reuters, the EPA is set to unveil new vehicle greenhouse gas emissions requirements that will ease annual requirements through 2030.

The goal of the EPA’s proposal in 2023 was to help combat air pollution and reduce greenhouse gases by forcing automakers to sell more EVs. Many automakers, though, voiced concerns about being able to meet the strict requirements, which become more severe as 2032 approaches. The upcoming revised vehicle greenhouse gas emissions requirements will reportedly reduce yearly requirements through 2030. This should allow them to move away from having to solely focus on coming out with EVs.

The Alliance for Automotive Innovation, which is a trade association and lobby group that represents most automakers that sell cars in the U.S., reportedly urged the EPA to finalize rules that brought the mandatory number of EVs on sale by 2030 to 50%, reports Reuters. If the EPA’s final requirements are closer to 50%, it would mark a noticeable reduction from its initial proposal.

2024 Polestar 2

Unnamed sources, though, told Reuters that the final emissions regulations soften “the pace of improvements and then sharply ramps up stringency requirements through 2032.” Reuters claims that the final requirements will help boost plug-in hybrid sales, as upcoming regulations are expected to allow automakers to have PHEVs account for more than 33% of their sales in 2032.

On top of new regulations that would reduce the number of EVs an automaker must sell, the EPA’s new regulations are also expected to have new wordage on the amount of particulate matter that gas-powered vehicles can emit. The outlet claims that the government agency will scale back its original proposal to reduce particulate matter emissions. Automakers originally argued against the EPA’s original requirements for brands to reduce particulate matter from gas-powered vehicles, claiming that they would require cars to come with particulate filters.

Reuters claims that automakers objected to the EPA’s plan to eliminate the practice of “enrichment.” The strategy is used by automakers to “boost performance and prevent engine damage from hot exhaust gases,” claims the outlet. If the EPA were to eliminate enrichment, it would require automakers to ditch some of their engines. Apparently, the EPA’s new requirements will drop verbiage on its plan to prohibit enrichment.

Based on Reuters’ claims, it sounds like the EPA is going to make a lot of changes to its greenhouse gas emissions requirements, which will certainly appease automakers.

Pictured: 2024 Ford F-150 Lightning (Top), 2024 Polestar 2 (Middle)

Source: Reuters

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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