GM Drastically Expands Chevy Bolt Battery Recall

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - August 23, 2021

General Motors has expanded a recall for its Chevrolet Bolt EV. The recall now includes 9,335 units of the Bolt EV from 2019 and 63,683 units of the Bolt EV from 2020 to 2022. The 2020 and 2022 model years include the new Bolt EV and Bolt EUV. The latest recall builds upon an earlier one from this July when GM announced that it was recalling approximately 69,000 Bolt EVs globally from 2017 to 2019, because of fires that occurred due to battery defects.

Chevrolet’s original recall from last November was set in motion after five Bolt EVs caught fire. The automaker came out with what it believed was a permanent fix for the electric vehicle earlier this year, but expanded the recall after two of the repaired Bolt EVs caught fire.

In its latest review, Chevrolet claims that the batteries that came from LG Chem could suffer from two manufacturing defects: a folded separator and a torn anode tab. These issues increase the risk of fire. In an overly cautious move, Chevy claims that it will be replacing defective battery modules in all of the affected Bolt EVs. Additionally, it’s providing an 8-year/100,000-mile limited warranty for the new modules.

GM investigated the initial incidents by looking into the manufacturing processes at LG and by disassembling battery packs. The automaker found manufacturing defects in certain battery cells that LG made at its manufacturing facilities. Going forward, GM and LG are working together to rectify the defects.

Until Bolt EV consumers receive new replacement battery modules for their vehicles, Chevrolet has a few recommendations. The first thing to do is to set your Bolt EV to a 90% state of charge limitation using the electric car’s Target Charge Level mode. The automaker also recommends Bolt EV owners charge their vehicle more frequently and avoid getting under 70 miles of range. The last recommendation is to park your Bolt EV outside immediately after charging and to avoid charging your car indoors overnight.

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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