Most-Expensive Nissan Ariya Costs Over $60,000

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - November 17, 2021

When Nissan came out with the all-electric Leaf in 2010, the automaker was a trailblazer in the electric scene. With its second all-electric vehicle, the upcoming Ariya, Nissan isn’t trying to blaze new paths anymore, it’s trying to show the world that it can make an upscale electric SUV that’s competitive in today’s market. With an estimated range of up to 300 miles and a starting price of $47,125 (with destination), the Ariya will put up a strong fight against the growing class.

That price is for the entry-level Ariya Venture+ with front-wheel drive. That model comes with a single electric motor that produces 238 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque, as well as an 87-kWh battery pack. Nissan claims the base Ariya will have an estimated range of up to 300 miles, making it the most capable Ariya when it comes to range.

At the top of the range sits the Platinum+ e-4ORCE AWD trim. It’s a mouthful, but it also packs a punch. The trim has two electric motors for a combined output of 389 hp and 442 lb-ft of torque. The extra performance drops range to 265 miles — the least of any Ariya in the lineup. But, if you want all-wheel drive, the range-topping Platinum+ trim is the only way to get it. Pricing for the most powerful and well-equipped Platinum+ costs $60,125.

These prices don’t include the current federal tax credit, which sits at $7,500. Unlike Tesla and General Motors, Nissan’s electric cars are still eligible for the full amount. That means the base Ariya will cost $39,625, while the top-end trim will start at $52,625. That gives the Ariya a large advantage over the SUVs from General Motors and Tesla, which aren’t eligible for any amount of the federal tax credit.

When the Ariya arrives at dealerships, it will compete against vehicles like the Tesla Model Y, Volkswagen ID.4, Ford Mustang Mach-E, Kia Niro EV, Hyundai Kona Electric, and Chevrolet Bolt EUV. The Ariya offers more range from its base trim than the majority of its competitors but costs quite a bit more.

The Model Y costs $62,190 and can travel up to 318 miles; ID.4 carries a starting price tag of $39,995 (doesn’t include destination) and has a range of 260 miles; Mustang Mach-E costs $43,995 and has a starting range of 230 miles; Niro EV starts at $41,165 and can travel 239 miles; Kona Electric costs $35,185 and offers up to 258 miles of range; and Bolt EUV starts at $33,995 and has up to 247 miles of range.

Compared to the competition, the Ariya lines up well against the Model Y and ID.4. Both of those are also available with AWD, have roughly the same amount of range, and are priced similarly to the Ariya. With the first 10,000 reservations made before January 31, 2022, receiving two free years of charging through EVgo, Nissan has done a lot to make its latest EV as attractive as possible.

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Pictured: 2023 Nissan Ariya

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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