2021 Ford Bronco Sport Fuel Economy Rated At 26 MPG

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - November 30, 2020

While we’ve seen the 2021 Ford Bronco Sport in its entirety, there’s one thing we’ve been waiting for: official fuel economy figures. The wait’s finally over, as the EPA has released its official figures for the baby off-roader.

As a refresher, the standard powertrain in the Bronco Sport is a turbocharged 1.5-liter three-cylinder engine that’s paired to an eight-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is standard with the engine. Output is rated at 181 horsepower and 190 pound-feet of torque. With the base engine, the Bronco Sport is rated to get up to 26 mpg combined.

A more powerful turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine is also available. The larger engine produces 245 hp and 275 lb-ft of torque. Just like the smaller engine, the 2.0-liter comes with an eight-speed automatic transmission and all-wheel drive. The 2.0-liter powertrain is rated by the EPA to get up to 23 mpg combined.

A 3 mpg difference between the two powertrains isn’t a massive gap and we don’t see it being a reason for consumers to stick with the base powertrain. If anything, we expect pricing to play a larger role in choosing between the two powertrains. The Base and Big Bend trims come with the more efficient 1.5-liter three-cylinder engine, while the Outer Banks is the first one in the lineup to come with the 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. The Base trim costs $28,155, the Big Bend starts at $29,655, and the Outer Banks costs $33,655.

Ford Bronco Sport

The major issue with the Bronco Sport is its fuel economy compared to the competition. The Escape, which is the Bronco Sport’s cousin, comes with a similar powertrain and is rated to get up to 28 mpg with all-wheel drive. With four-wheel drive, the Jeep Compass gets 25 mpg combined, while the smaller Renegade has a 26-mpg combined rating. With standard all-wheel drive, the Subaru Crosstrek is rated at 30 mpg combined.

The majority of mainstream options in the compact segment – the Honda CR-V (29 mpg combined), Toyota RAV4 (30 mpg combined), Mazda CX-5 (26 mpg combined), Nissan Rogue (29 mpg combined), and Subaru Forester (29 mpg combined) – get better fuel economy when equipped with all-wheel drive over the Bronco Sport. Since the Bronco Sport is slightly smaller than the average compact SUV, but slightly larger than a subcompact, seeing it get worse fuel economy than the majority of compact SUVs is surprising.

We don’t think fuel economy will play a large role for consumers looking to purchase a Bronco Sport. The compact SUV is being marketed as a tiny, civilized off-roader. Consumers shopping for the Bronco Sport, just like with the Bronco, will probably be willing to sacrifice fuel economy for off-roading capability, the SUV’s rugged design, and name.

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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