2021 Ford F-150 Hybrid Fuel Economy Rated At 24 MPG

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - November 13, 2020

Ford’s first-ever hybrid variant of the F-150 pickup truck received an official fuel economy rating by the EPA at 24 mpg combined. While that figure makes the hybrid powertrain the most efficient one in the lineup, it’s not exactly by a wide margin.

The available turbocharged 2.7-liter V6 engine is rated at up to 22 mpg combined when equipped with rear-wheel drive. All-wheel drive with that engine brings lower figures of 21 mpg combined. The standard 3.3-liter V6 can get up to 21 mpg combined, and the turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 and 5.0-liter V8 are both rated at up to 20 mpg combined.

The thing about the F-150 Hybrid is that it brings a lot more performance. The hybrid powertrain is rated at 430 horsepower and 570 pound-feet of torque, which is the most amount of torque of any powertrain. The turbocharged 2.7-liter V6 is rated at 325 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque. Additionally, the hybrid engine is rated to tow up to 12,700 pounds; the best the 2.7-liter EcoBoost engine can muster is 10,100 pounds. So, you’re getting a large increase in performance, along with slightly better fuel economy with the hybrid engine.

Ford F-150

The major issue with the new hybrid powertrain is its price. The engine is available throughout the lineup and for models that come with the standard 3.3-liter V6 engine, the hybrid engine is an extra $4,495. For the base XL trim, the 2.7-liter EcoBoost V6 is a $1,195 option. An extra $3,300 is a pricey upgrade, but it certainly looks like it’s worth the extra money.

Since Ford isn’t offering the diesel engine at launch, we can see a lot of consumers deciding to go with the hybrid option. Additionally, the hybrid engine is $500 cheaper than the 3.0-liter diesel V6, which doesn’t have an official fuel economy rating from the EPA yet. That engine produces 250 hp and 440 lb-ft of torque and is rated to tow up to 12,100 pounds. With more power, a higher towing capacity, and a lower price tag, Ford’s decision to delay the diesel engine could increase the take rate for the hybrid.

Learn more about the 2021 Ford F-150 »

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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