2022 Kia Carnival Sees $1,700 Starting Price Increase

By

Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

, Automotive Editor - March 1, 2021

For the 2022 model year, Kia has changed the name of its minivan from Sedona to Carnival. In addition to the name change, Kia has given its minivan a more upscale interior design and a heavily updated exterior design that makes the Carnival look far more high-end than the Sedona. As one would expect, these changes bring a higher starting price, as the 2022 Kia Carnival starts at $33,275 (prices include destination) for the base LX trim.

The starting price for the Carnival, compared to last year’s Sedona, has gone up by $1,700. Standard features for the base LX trim include an 8-inch touchscreen, power sliding rear doors, 17-inch alloy wheels, LED headlights, sliding and removable second-row seats, remote keyless entry, and push-button start. On the tech front, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring, rear seat alert, lane keeping assist, safe exist assist, and rear cross traffic alert are all standard. That’s a healthy list of standard features.

If you need seating for up to eight people, Kia’s offering an available Seating Package for the base LX trim that costs $2,000. It brings a total of eight seats, synthetic leather upholstery, heated front seats, an eight-way power driver’s seat, and a leather-covered steering wheel.

Kia Carnival

The next step up is the EX trim, which is priced at $38,775 – a large increase of $3,900 from last year. Eight-passenger seating, tri-zone climate control, heated front seats, synthetic upholstery, a power tailgate, a wireless smartphone charger, an in-cabin camera, an in-cabin intercom, highway driving assist, and a 12.3-inch display are standard. The $42,275 SX trim is actually $400 cheaper than before and adds ventilated front seats, a power passenger seat, a surround-view camera, and a rear-seat entertainment system.

At the top of the lineup, Kia has added a new SX Prestige trim that costs $47,275. The SX Prestige trim brings unique touches, like leather upholstery, dual sunroofs, second-row VIP lounge seats, heated and ventilated rear seats, a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster, and a Bose audio system.

Every Carnival comes with a 290-horsepower 3.5-liter V6 engine that’s paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission. Front-wheel drive is the only option offered with the Carnival, putting it at a disadvantage compared to the Toyota Sienna and Chrysler Pacifica. Even without the feature, the new Carnival is worth the extra money over the old Sedona and is still one of the more affordable vans on sale. Compared to the competition, the Carnival is cheaper than the Toyota Sienna ($35,635) and the Chrysler Pacifica ($36,690) but is more expensive than the Honda Odyssey ($33,265) and the Chrysler Voyager ($28,480).

The high-end cabin, more upscale styling, claimed best-in-class passenger room of 168.2 cubic feet, and best-in-class total cargo capacity of 145.1 cubic feet make the Carnival more competitive in the segment. Kia’s certainly aimed upstream with the minivan, which is something only Chrysler has focused on with the Pacifica. The more upright, upscale design ensures the Carnival won’t fall through the cracks like other minivans without standing out like the Sienna. Kia’s new Slide-Flex system, which sees the minivan come with a sliding middle seating for easier access to the third row, also ensures that owners are getting a versatile machine. The Carnival raises the bar compared to the Sedona and will go on sale sometime in the second quarter of this year.

Learn more about the 2022 Kia Carnival »

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

Privacy Policy|Do Not Sell My Personal Information|Terms of Use|Cookie Policy|Disclaimer|
COPYRIGHT 1999-2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba CarsDirect.com