2022 Toyota Tundra Has a Hybrid Twin-Turbo V6

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - September 21, 2021

On paper, hybrid powertrains make plenty of sense for full-size pickup trucks. Hybrid powertrains can make full-size pickup trucks more efficient, but also deliver more torque – an important number for consumers that are interested in towing large cargo.

Ford is the only automaker to offer a real hybrid with the F-150 Powerboost. Ram’s hybrid system on the 1500 is a mild 48-volt system, and Chevrolet doesn’t offer a hybrid powertrain on the Silverado 1500. The F-150 Hybrid is getting some competition, because the fully redesigned 2022 Toyota Tundra is available with a hybrid powertrain for the first time.

Before we get into the hybrid engine, here’s a rundown on the 2022 Tundra’s base powertrain. The full-size pickup comes with a standard twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 that’s rated at 389 horsepower and 479 pound-feet of torque. Compared to other base engines from Ram, Chevrolet, and Ford, the Tundra’s make the most torque. Toyota hasn’t released towing capacity for the base engine yet.

Unlike other full-size pickups, Toyota won’t be offering the 2022 Tundra with a V8 engine – at least not when the pickup truck initially goes on sale. The range-topping engine for the Tundra is twin-turbo 3.5-liter V6 that’s paired with an electric motor and a 10-speed automatic transmission. Toyota’s calling the powertrain i-Force Max. Combined output is rated at 437 hp and 583 lb-ft of torque.

The Tundra’s hybrid powertrain lines up well against the F-150 Hybrid, which comes with nearly the same configuration as the Tundra, but is rated to make 430 hp and 570 lb-ft of torque. While the Tundra’s available hybrid powertrain makes more power than the F-150 Hybrid’s, it’s down on towing capacity. With the hybrid, the Tundra can tow up to 12,000 pounds and haul up to 1,940 pounds. The F-150 Hybrid is rated to tow 12,700 pounds and haul 2,120 pounds.

Toyota includes a 1.87-kWh nickel-metal hydride battery pack with the Tundra’s hybrid powertrain. The battery pack is mounted underneath the rear seats, which might eat into the pickup’s interior space. Ford places the F-150 Hybrid’s battery pack underneath the bed to avoid influencing the amount of space in the cabin.

The EPA hasn’t released official fuel economy figures for the 2022 Tundra yet and Toyota didn’t provide an estimate for the truck, either. Based on the output, we think the Tundra will get slightly worse figures than the F-150 Hybrid that’s rated at up to 25 mpg combined. While Ford’s hybrid can act as a generator to power a house during a blackout, Toyota doesn’t mention anything like that in its press release for the Tundra.

Toyota claims the i-Force Max powertrain also aids in off-roading, providing low-end grunt to tackle terrain. The hybrid powertrain will be the only available engine for the rugged TRD Pro trim, highlighting its place as the top dog in the pickup’s lineup. The i-Force Max powertrain will also be available on Limited, Platinum, and 1794 trims.

As one of just two options in the full-size pickup truck class to come with a hybrid powertrain, we think the addition will greatly increase the 2022 Tundra’s appeal. While the Tundra is down on towing capacity compared to the F-150 Hybrid and it doesn’t come with the trick feature to be used as a generator, it’s not too far off and has more power. We think it will come down to fuel economy and pricing, which are two things we’re still waiting for.

Ford offers the hybrid powertrain on the base XL trim in the SuperCrew trim for $43,190 with destination.

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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