2023 Nissan Z Specs Promise 400 hp, 350 lb-ft

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Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - August 18, 2021

The 2023 Nissan Z is finally here. While the sports car won’t be called the 400Z, but simply the Z, it boasts some serious performance numbers. The sports car segment may be shrinking, but the Z arrives with a much-needed burst of life, just like the 350Z did when it made its debut in 2001.

Enthusiasts haven’t had much to be happy about in the sports car realm, but the Z will definitely put a smile on your face. It’s packing a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 that’s rated at 400 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque. The engine isn’t new, as it’s powered the Infiniti Q50 and Q60 since 2016. In another move that will excite enthusiasts, the Z comes with a six-speed manual transmission as standard. The manual gearbox has a rev-matching system, a high-performance Exedy clutch, and a carbon fiber composite driveshaft.

With the punchy V6 engine, an available launch-assist control system, and the optional nine-speed automatic transmission, Nissan claims the new Z has a zero-to-60 mph time that’s 15% quicker than the outgoing 370Z. That means the 2023 Z should be able to get to 60 mph in around 4 seconds. That’s quick and exactly what we expected to see from the new Z.

To bring the sports car to a halt, the Z features 14-inch front rotors and 13.8-inch rotors at the back. Four-piston brakes are at the front, while two-piston units are at the back. The Sport trim has smaller 12.6-inch rotors at the front and 12.1-inch rotors at the back.

At the time of launch, the 2023 Z will be available in two trims: Sport and Performance. In addition to the larger brakes, the Performance trim comes with larger 19-inch Rays aluminum-alloy wheels and high-performance Bridgestone tires. The Sport trim has 18-inch wheels and Yokohama performance tires. Additionally, the Performance trim has a front and rear spoiler for improved handling.

Speaking of handling, the Z has a double-wishbone suspension at the front and a multi-link setup at the back. The front suspension has updated geometry compared to the 370Z for improved stability and straight-line tracking, while the multi-link suspension has been revised. Body rigidity, larger tires, and updated monotone shocks should further improve cornering capability.

Beyond the Sport and Performance trims, Nissan will also offer the 2023 Z in a special Edition Proto Spec variant. The model comes with yellow accents, bronze 19-inch Rays wheels, a black roof, and yellow brake calipers. The same yellow and black accents carry into the cabin. Nissan will only build 240 units of the Proto Spec.

The 2023 Nissan Z looks like an awesome sports car. It’s going up against one true competitor: the Toyota GR Supra. The Supra is available with both four-cylinder and six-cylinder engines. The GR Supra 3.0 is the closest competitor to the Z. It comes with a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six from BMW that’s rated at 382 horsepower. It’s only available with an eight-speed automatic transmission and can get to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds. The Supra is an amazing sports car with thrilling straight-line speed and sharp handling, though it’s lacking something that the Z offers — a manual transmission.

Based on the figures that Nissan has provided, the 2023 Z seems like it has what it takes to be a true competitor in the sports car segment. We’re interested to see how much Nissan charges for the sports car, as that’s one of the main drawbacks with the GR Supra 3.0, which costs $52,115 with destination. With all of the changes, we expect the Z to be priced at around $40,000. If true, that would make it a bargain.

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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