Lexus GS Sedan Discontinued For 2021

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - April 24, 2020

The Lexus GS is dying after the 2020 model year. The Japanese luxury automaker confirmed the news with Car and Driver earlier this week, and bad sales are to blame. Rumors of the GS’ death have been circulating for years, we first heard about the possibility back in 2017, as finding one of the sedans on dealer lots started to become more difficult back then. Just last year, Lexus discontinued the GS 300 for the 2020 model year. So, we saw this coming.

According to Good Car Bad Car, the GS hasn’t been an especially popular vehicle in the U.S. In 2019, Lexus sold just 3,378 units of the GS. In the same year, BMW sold 38,709 units of the 5-Series, Audi sold 17,807 A6 sedans, and Mercedes-Benz sold 40,113 E-Class and CLS-Class sedans combined (for some strange reason, Mercedes counts these two vehicles as one car in its sales figures). Sales for the GS have been shrinking since 2015 and the car has become Lexus’ worst-selling four-door sedan. The midsize ES has been incredibly popular, as Lexus sold 51,336 units in 2019.

Lexus GS

Lexus introduced the GS sedan in 1993 as a competitor to German options. For years, Lexus sold both the GS and ES alongside one another, though the ES always did much better. Recently, the GS morphed into an athletic midsize sedan, while the front-wheel-drive ES shifted toward being the more well-rounded option. With its 3.5-liter V6, available naturally-aspirated 5.0-liter V8 in the high-performance GS F, and rear-wheel-drive platform, the GS is a dinosaur. A lack of updates for the GS probably played a role in the sedan’s death, too, as the current generation came out in 2013 while others in the segment were recently updated.

If there’s one thing going for the GS, it’s pricing. The midsize sedan costs less than its main rivals, carrying a price tag of $52,420 (including destination). That makes it cheaper than the Mercedes-Benz E-Class ($55,045), BMW 5-Series ($54,895), and Audi A6 ($55,895).

To say goodbye to the GS, Lexus introduced a new Black Line Special Edition Model that’s based on the GS 350 F Sport. It doesn’t add much, bringing black wheels, orange brake calipers, and black exterior trim pieces, as well as red interior accents. Each special edition will come with a Zero Halliburton two-piece luggage set that has specifically designed for the vehicle, too. Only 200 units of the Black Line Special Edition will be made with pricing yet to be announced.

As enthusiasts, we’re sad to hear of the GS’ death – especially the GS F, which was one of the last sedans to come with a naturally-aspirated V8 engine. As consumers, the GS just couldn’t cut it compared to newer, more modern, and more stylish competitors. With consumers moving away from sedans to SUVs, we doubt the GS will be replaced by a successor.

Learn more about the current Lexus GS on sale now »

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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