New Mercedes-Benz 4-Cylinder Engine Packs Up To 416 HP

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Automotive Editor

Anthony Alaniz is an award-winning journalist living in southeast Michigan. His professional writing career spans nearly a decade, ranging from writing for the local newspaper to Autoweek and Motor1. When he's not writing about cars, he covers the horror film genre at Modernhorrors.com.

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, Automotive Editor - June 7, 2019

It’s the most powerful four-cylinder engine ever.

Mercedes has worked tirelessly over the years to wring every last drop of power from its four-cylinder turbocharged engine, and now the company claims it has the most powerful four-cylinder engine ever—the M 139. It’s a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making 416 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque in its top S spec. The standard M 139 mill produces 382 hp and 354 lb-ft of torque.

Mercedes will put the engine in a variety of models ranging from the A45, which won’t come to the U.S., and the CLA 45, which will. Both are performance-oriented Mercedes-AMG modes that blend performance and luxury into one package. The engine could end up in other Mercedes vehicles, too, such as the GLB-Class crossover.

The engine makes its impressive power numbers through a variety of mechanical means. The turbocharger makes 30.5 psi in the S engine compared to 27.6 psi in the standard powerplant. The engine features both indirect injection into the intake manifold and direct injection into the cylinder. The engine features dual overhead cams, 16 valves, and a twin-scroll supercharger.

Mercedes-Benz four-cylinder engine

It’s not like Mercedes had a slouch of an engine before the new M 139. The previous turbocharged 2.0-liter made a still impressive 375 hp. Other potent four-cylinder engines include the turbo 2.3-liter Ford Focus RS making 350 hp, The 2.5-liter turbo engine in the Porsche Cayman S that produces 350 hp, the turbo 2.3-liter in the Ford Mustang that makes 310 hp, and the Honda Civic Type R’s turbo 2.0-liter making 306 hp. The Mercedes engine outperforms them all.

As automakers search to improve efficiency, they’re downsizing engines while adding forced induction to compensate for the smaller engine displacement size. In this guise, the purpose isn’t so much about fuel efficiency. Instead, it’s about packing a lot of power into a small package, and it looks like Mercedes was successful.

See Mercedes-Benz's current lineup »

, Automotive Editor

Anthony Alaniz is an award-winning journalist living in southeast Michigan. His professional writing career spans nearly a decade, ranging from writing for the local newspaper to Autoweek and Motor1. When he's not writing about cars, he covers the horror film genre at Modernhorrors.com.

Follow On: Twitter | Website

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