Nissan Making its Suite of Safety Technology Standard on Rogue, Altima

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - September 14, 2018

Safety has always been one of the largest factors when it comes to choosing one automaker over another. The introduction of modern safety technologies has created a large divide between automakers that offer a lot of features as standard and those that make them expensive options. Nissan is the latest automaker to announce plans to make high-tech safety features standard on its vehicles.

Nissan recently rolled out with Safety Shield 360, which includes six active safety features: automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, lane departure warning, high beam assist, and rear automatic emergency braking. The suite of safety features will be available as standard on the automaker's top-selling models by 2021.

If you're not interested in waiting that long, Safety Shield 360 will be available on the 2019 Rogue, Rogue Sport, and Altima. Unfortunately, it'll only be standard on higher level trims like the SV and SL.

“Our philosophy is to bring Nissan Intelligent Mobility technologies to market in our most popular and affordable vehicles,” said Denis Le Vot, chairman, Nissan North America in press release. “Safety Shield 360 combines six advanced systems to give models like Altima and Rogue a class-leading package of technologies that can improve safety and the overall driving experience for Nissan owners.”

Nissan joins Honda and Toyota as automakers that are looking to have a complete suite of standard safety features on its vehicles. Earlier this year, Honda stated that it was looking to make its Honda Sensing suite standard on every model by 2022. Toyota has a similar goal with its Safety Sense package of technologies.

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter | Website