Hondas May Be Recalled For Sudden Emergency Braking

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - April 19, 2024
2022 Honda CR-V

In February 2022, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTS) Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) started to look into reports of the automatic emergency braking (AEB) system on 2017 to 2019 Honda CR-V and 2018 to 2019 Honda Accord models inadvertently engaging. Earlier this week, the NHTSA announced that it would be upgrading the probe to an “Engineering Analysis” to “further assess the scope, frequency, and potential safety-related consequences” of the AEB system inadvertently engaging.

In addition to upgrading the probe to an Engineering Analysis, the NHTSA has also expanded the model years of vehicles it’s looking into. The Engineering Analysis is now looking into 2017 to 2022 Honda CR-V and 2018 to 2022 Honda Accord models. The number of vehicles has expanded to an estimated 2,997,604 models.

According to the NHTSA, the problem with the vehicles is an “inadvertent or unexpected activation of the automatic emergency braking system may cause rapid vehicle deceleration which increases risk of a collision.” Apparently, affected vehicles have an AEB system that activates with no obstruction in front of the car, “resulting in sudden vehicle deceleration.” The NHTSA claims that it knows about 47 crashes because of the issue and a total of 112 injuries.

2019 Honda Accord

Honda is working with ODI to get more information on the alleged defect, but there seems to be some misunderstanding between the automaker and vehicle owners. In its summary, the NHTSA claims that Honda provided an analysis of the alleged defect and claims that some customers “possibly had an inadequate understanding of the Collision Mitigation Braking System (CMBS) and its limitations.” On the other hand, many complaints from consumers that the NHTSA has received allege that Honda dealerships weren’t able to “reproduce the condition or state that they were informed that this is considered normal CMBS operation.”

In a statement to the Associated Press, Honda claimed that it would continue to cooperate with the NHTSA and “will continue our own internal review of the available information.”

According to the NHTSA’s website, it takes approximately 18 months to complete an engineering analysis and can lead to a recall.

Pictured: 2022 Honda CR-V (Top), 2019 Honda Accord (Middle)

Source: Associated Press

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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