Safer Cars Are Too Expensive to Repair

By

Automotive Editor

Zac Estrada is an automotive journalist and contributing writer who hails from Santa Barbara, CA. Zac attended Northeastern University's School of Journalism in Boston and currently runs the automotive blog Confessions of an Autoholic. 

Follow On: Twitter | Google+ | Website

, Automotive Editor - May 12, 2017

The technology making new cars safer than ever before is also making them less worthwhile to be repaired after a crash.

That's the latest from a new report from Bob Tschippert, senior vice president of underwriter Risk Theory, who told Automotive News this week the expensive airbags and crash-sensing technology being added to new cars is increasing the amount of vehicles being declared "totaled" by insurance companies.

"In the past, if you had a front-end collision, you had damage to the engine or the front end," Tschippert said to AN. "But now, with the number of airbags that can run from $1,000 up to $4,000 and all the sensors up front, you're seeing more totals."

The airbag situation has also been complicated by the wave of Takata airbag recalls that have made some parts more difficult to find and insurance companies more likely to declare a vehicle a total loss if the airbags were deployed in a crash.

While many of the new technologies are implemented to avoid a crash altogether, minor collisions are now more of a problem for both drivers and insurance companies.

, Automotive Editor

Zac Estrada is an automotive journalist and contributing writer who hails from Santa Barbara, CA. Zac attended Northeastern University's School of Journalism in Boston and currently runs the automotive blog Confessions of an Autoholic. 

Follow On: Twitter | Google+ | Website