How to Find Tire Sales Online

February 17, 2012

Most lowball tire sales should be avoided, but it's easy to find high quality tires on sale if you know where to look.

Tire Sale

When searching for tire sales online, you need to remember that there are additional costs besides just the tires. There will be shipping and installation costs as well.

Websites
You can use search engines to find tire sales or visit the websites for well known tire manufacturers. These manufacturers will be able to provide you information on retailers in your area and online that carry their products. Goodyear tire sales can be found almost anywhere, but instead of driving all over the place, get the information you need from the comfort of your own home.

Used and Wholesale Tires
When investigating used tire sales, try and get as many high quality pictures as possible as you want to make sure there are no cracks in the rubber. You may find some fine perish lines which are normal for used tires. Get information on the history of the tire. Has it had any repairs; was it ever flat? Repairs may mean that air or moisture could have gotten into the casing, which can cause problems as the tire ages.

You can save a lot of money on tires buying through a wholesaler. It's only a good idea if you need a lot of tires. You can find tire wholesalers by looking through the phone book, talking to individuals in the auto industry, or by performing a search for online wholesalers. Before you can purchase tires, you will have to submit an application. If you frequently purchase tires, then buying wholesale is something you should check out.

Truck Tire Sales
Most tire companies have their own truck tire division. Truck tires can be quite expensive, and this is where shopping online can really help to keep the money in your wallet. Many tire companies have sales throughout the year. You can also find specials at larger stores associated with trucks such as Sears. It is important to ensure your truck tires have been properly rated, as truck tires need to be stronger than car tires.

Tire Sales to Avoid
Reputable tire dealers sometimes have sales that offer good-quality tires for low prices. However, there are certain types of tire sales that you should avoid altogether. While prices may be low, you may be putting your car and yourself at risk for an accident.

  • Chinese tire sales.Generally speaking, you should avoid companies that sell cheap and often substandard, imported Chinese tires. Look at almost any major city local newspaper and you will see advertisements for a complete set of 4 tires for as low as $89 or $99. However, you should avoid these types of tires at all costs—they are generally of very low quality. Many of these cheap, imported Chinese tires lack the basic safety features that quality tire manufacturers implement in even their most affordable tires. Safety and performance features like gum strips, belt stiffeners, bead wedges and nylon cap plies, which are all considered to be standard safety features in many of today's tires, are often missing from the low price Chinese import tires. Furthermore, quality tires generally are not that much more expensive. In fact, a quality set of discount tires can be had for as little as $150 to $200
  • Recap tire sales. Some tire dealers will often offer recap tires as a good alternative to new tires. While recap tires are certainly much cheaper than new tires, the quality and reliability of recap tires is the issue of much debate and may prove to be unsafe or even dangerous in some applications. Therefore, never consider recap tires unless you really have no other option. Even then, use recap tires as a very short term solution until you can purchase new tires

Tire Sale Fine Print Examined
Nearly anyone who has recently bought a set of tires can tell you that tire sale contracts have become complicated documents including a barrage of information that may confuse you. Taking a look at the fine print of a tire contract can show you why you may be paying more than you originally thought you would.

  • Look for where and how discounts are applied.Lots of tire sellers offer neat rebate or discount prices that they just compensate for with other line items. A savvy driver can spot extra prices for alignment and other services in the contract, and be able to pinpoint where discounts are actually applied
  • Read the warranty for limitations.One big deal with tire contracts is that tires are rated for specific mileage. The warranty means that if tires don't last up to their rating, the seller will replace them for free. However, unknown to some buyers, many contracts include a host of limitations that will void the warranty. These include lack of proper alignment, periodic rotation, and other calibrations of the tires. That means that if a buyer comes back to the retail shop with excessive wear on their tires, the representatives will use any of these loopholes to avoid replacing the tires as per the contract
  • Look for tacked-on extras.Another issue with extended warranty is that some tire shops tend to slip in extra packages that basically over-insure the tires. These might be called "road hazard security," "lifetime certificate," or any such phrase. Extra warranty means extra cost, and buyers to look at the bottom line may not be able to see where these extras were added to boost the final sale price
  • Keep an eye out for bargains through specialty discounting in package deals. One way to avoid some of the above problems is to find tire shops offering limited deals that include free alignment and other tire calibration. These discount packages are good for buyers who otherwise would have been tempted to skip some essential calibration and end up with a voided warranty. Remember, it's not a deal if lack of proper installation causes your tires to wear out much quicker than they should. The same hidden dangers apply to all kinds of tire sales, including factory direct tire sales (where overall packages may be lower in price). These kinds of concerns especially apply to Internet tire sales where the seller may not actually have a shop to do any of the necessary calibration