Chrysler Voyager vs. Chrysler Pacifica

By

Automotive Editor

Willis is a freelance writer based out of Philadelphia. Born and raised in Colorado, he graduated from Williams College. When he's not writing about cars or the outdoors, he spends his time rock climbing or reading with his two cats.


, Automotive Editor - January 21, 2020

The Chrysler Voyager marks the return of a legacy nameplate for the brand, but the model isn’t technically a new one. Instead, it’s a spin-off – take two trims of the acclaimed Chrysler Pacifica, separate the features, and call it new.

So, what’s the real difference between the Voyager and Pacifica? We took a look at the details to find out what the Voyager brings to the table.

See a side-by-side comparison of the Voyager & Pacifica »

What the Voyager Gets Right

The Voyager model took over for the lowest two trims of last year’s Pacifica model. This makes it by far the cheaper of the two options: a base Voyager starts at $28,480, while a Pacifica will set you back $34,990 to start – a $6,510 difference.

Despite the substantial price gap, the Voyager looks like the same car from the outside. The two models share the same body and styling, minus the Pacifica’s chrome grille. The base Voyager comes with steel wheels, but the LX trim wears the same aluminum rims as the base Pacifica.

Things look similar on the inside as well, especially on the dash. The Voyager starts with the same 7-inch infotainment touchscreen that the Pacifica gets, complete with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The Voyager starts with a second row bench, but the LX trim gets captain’s chairs.

The Voyager may not get all the fanciest features, but it’s still reasonably equipped for minivan duty. That’s especially true in the LX trim, which gets a power driver’s seat and wheel-mounted audio controls. Blind-spot monitoring and rear parking sensors are on the options list for safety.

What the Pacifica Gets Right

The Pacifica may cost more than the Voyager, but it packs more into the same package. That starts with standard features, which include power doors, a power liftgate, three-zone automatic climate control, remote start, and a power-adjustable front row.

The second and third rows are Chrysler’s nifty Stow ’n Go seats, which add utility and are easy to use. Safety tech is also standard on the Pacifica, including blind-spot monitoring and parking sensors. Many upper trims include automatic emergency braking.

If you do step up to the highest trims, you’ll find hands-free doors, a stowable vacuum, Nappa leather upholstery, and a panoramic power sunroof. If comfort is the goal, the Pacifica takes an easy victory.

But the Pacifica’s biggest trump card is its optional hybrid powertrain. Capable of an EPA-estimated 30 miles per gallon combined, the Pacifica Hybrid remains the only hybrid minivan on the market.

Frugal or Fancy?

If all you need is a bare-bones minivan, the Voyager will still deliver. It’s a stripped-down version of the Pacifica, offering the same space and looks without the price of entry. The Voyager's price even undercuts competition from Honda and Toyota.

But if you’re after the full experience – especially if you want the hybrid powertrain – the Pacifica is still the only option. It comes with the features we imagine most family buyers will look for, and it wraps them in a more comfortable package.

Our Verdict: Chrysler Pacifica

Both of these models are class leaders, the Voyager for its price and the Pacifica for its polish. The Voyager should draw its fair share of buyers, but we’d still rather own the Pacifica.

The price increase is warranted with all the included equipment, and family buyers will appreciate the attention to safety and practicality. For those who want to go green, a hybrid option is the cherry on top.

Take a closer look at the Chrysler Voyager »

Take a closer look at the Chrysler Pacifica »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Willis is a freelance writer based out of Philadelphia. Born and raised in Colorado, he graduated from Williams College. When he's not writing about cars or the outdoors, he spends his time rock climbing or reading with his two cats.


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