Toyota Tundra vs. Ford F-150

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - March 27, 2024
2024 Ford F-150

Drivers looking to get a full-size pickup that could be used for heavy-duty tasks and daily use have always found the Ford F-150 to be one of the best options on sale. The F-150 has always managed to be a well-rounded option, but for 2024, the F-150 becomes even better with noteworthy updates. For the new model year, Ford has given the F-150 an updated powertrain lineup, an updated exterior design, more standard tech features, and an expanded lineup with the return of the Tremor trim.

While Ford has updated the F-150 for 2024, the Toyota Tundra enters the new model year unchanged. Higher trim levels come with more advanced features, but the Tundra, which was last fully redesigned for 2022, remains as competitive as ever. Not to mention, with the death of the Nissan Titan, the Tundra is the only non-American option in the segment.

Shoppers in the market for a full-size pickup truck have some trouble choosing between these two models. In this comparison, we’ll look at the similarities and differences between the Tundra and the F-150 when it comes to price, reliability, fuel economy, towing capacity, and size to help you decide which one is right for you.

Tundra vs. F-150 Price

2023 Toyota Tundra

Toyota Tundra prices start at $41,815 (with destination), while the most expensive Toyota Tundra costs $80,695. In comparison, the cheapest Ford F-150 starts at $38,765 and the most expensive Ford F-150 is priced at $111,550.

There’s a $3,050 price difference between the Toyota Tundra and the Ford F-150, with the F-150 being the cheaper of the two models when comparing entry-level trucks to one another. At the top of the range, the Tundra is $30,855 less than the F-150.

While the Tundra has a higher starting price tag than the F-150, lease deals tend to be better for the Toyota than they are for the Ford. Ford, though, tends to have better financing and purchase deals in place for the F-150.

Tundra vs. F-150 Reliability

2023 Toyota Tundra Dashboard

Based on Consumer Reports data, the Ford F-150 may be more reliable than the Toyota Tundra. In the organization’s testing, the 2024 F-150 earned a predicted reliability score of 35 out of 100 and has a predicted owner satisfaction score of three out of five. Currently, the F-150 is ranked in fourth place out of 10 full-size pickup trucks.

In comparison, the Toyota Tundra may be less reliable than the F-150. The Tundra has a reliability score of 30 out of 100 and a predicted owner satisfaction score of three out of five. In the organization’s ranking of full-size pickup trucks, the Tundra is in ninth place.

Tundra vs. F-150 Gas Mileage & Towing

2023 Toyota Tundra Towing

Toyota and Ford both offer their respective full-size pickup trucks with hybrid powertrains. The Toyota Tundra Hybrid comes with a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 engine that’s paired with an electric motor. The Tundra Hybrid’s powertrain also comes with a 1.87-kWh battery pack and a 10-speed automatic transmission. The electrified powertrain is rated at up to 437 horsepower and 583pound-feet of torque. With rear-wheel drive, the Tundra Hybrid can get up to 22 mpg combined.

The Ford F-150 Hybrid features a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 and an electric motor. The powertrain also includes a 1.5-kWh lithium-ion battery pack and a 10-speed automatic transmission. Combined output is rated at 430 hp and 570 lb-ft of torque. With RWD, the F-150 Hybrid can get up to 23 mpg combined.

When it comes to towing capacity, the Toyota Tundra maxes out at 12,000 pounds. That puts it well behind the Ford F-150, which offers up to 13,500 pounds of towing capacity. It’s a similar story when it comes to payload capacity. Maximum payload capacity with the Tundra is 1,940 pounds and 2,445 pounds with the F-150.

Tundra vs. F-150 Size

2024 Ford F-150 Interior

As full-size pickup trucks, the Toyota Tundra and Ford F-150 are similar in size to one another. Both pickup trucks are available with similar bed sizes and are available in similar body configurations. The F-150 is available with three different bed sizes that include a 5.5-foot bed, a 6.5-foot bed, and an eight-foot bed. Toyota also offers the Tundra in three beds that include a 5.5-foot bed, a 6.5-foot bed, and an 8-foot-1-inch bed.

When it comes to available body styles, the Tundra is available in Double Cab (half-sized rear doors) and CrewMax (Crew Cab) body styles. The F-150 is available in Regular (two-door), Super Cab (half-sized rear doors), and SuperCrew (crew cab) body styles.

Which Is Better: Toyota Tundra or Ford F-150?

There’s a reason why the Ford F-150 is an American icon. The pickup truck manages to do everything well. It has class-leading towing capacity, an efficient hybrid engine, advanced tech features, a well-rounded lineup of engines, rugged trims that can go off-roading, and high-end trims that pamper owners with luxury. Regardless of what you’re looking for with a pickup truck, there’s an F-150 out there for your needs.

While the Toyota Tundra loses this comparison, it’s a good full-size pickup truck. The Tundra’s standard twin-turbo V6 engine has good performance, while the available hybrid powertrain offers an impressive amount of grunt. The truck has a smooth ride, high-tech features, and a spacious cabin. Compared to the F-150, it trails the Ford when it comes to towing and payload capacities, available configurations, work-friendly features, and off-roading capability.

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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