Toyota Tundra vs. Ford F-150

By

Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

, Automotive Editor - December 14, 2022
2023 Ford F-150

After years of falling behind American rivals in nearly every single category, Toyota has introduced a fully redesigned Tundra for 2022. Big, bold, and brash, the Tundra is a massive improvement over the outgoing model. If you’re shopping for a large pickup truck, the Tundra definitely belongs on your short list of options to explore, but has Toyota done enough for the Tundra to be competitive against the Ford F-150? There’s one main reason why the truck has been the best-selling vehicle in the U.S. for decades – it manages to do everything well.

Here’s a brief comparison of some of the key differences and similarities between the Tundra and the F-150. We’ll take a look at pricing, reliability, fuel economy, towing capacity, and size to name a better option for most shoppers. Whether you’re looking for a highly capable large pickup truck or a luxurious option that’s loaded with tech, we can help you decide which one is right for you.

Toyota Tundra vs. Ford F-150 Price

2022 Ford F-150

Toyota offers the Tundra in Double Cab and Crew Cab body styles, while Ford offers the F-150 in Regular, Super Cab, and SuperCrew body styles. The two-door Regular body style makes the F-150 far more affordable than the Tundra. The F-150 starts at $36,240 (prices include destination), while the Tundra costs $38,760. Comparing similarly styled pickup trucks to one another, the F-150 starts at $40,100. Consumers that choose the cheapest F-150 can save roughly $2,500 by choosing the Ford, but when it comes to similarly configured trucks, the Tundra is nearly $1,300 cheaper.

While there’s a large difference between the two entry-level trucks, the F-150 is the cheaper of the two to lease. This month, shoppers can lease an F-150 XL SuperCrew for as low as $519 per month for 36 months with $4,639 due at signing. The Tundra SR CrewMax is being offered for $545 per month with $3,195 due at signing.

The Tundra is one of the few pickup trucks that’s not available with a Regular Cab body style, which makes it one of the pricier options in the segment. For the large class, the F-150 is competitively priced against its domestic rivals.

Tundra vs. F-150 Reliability

2022 Toyota Tundra

Using Consumer Reports’ data on reliability, the Tundra is the more reliable of the two trucks. That’s surprising, as the first model year of a full redesign tends to be the least reliable model available. In the organization’s testing, the Tundra finished in third place for full-size pickup trucks. It earned a three out of five for predicted reliability and a four out of five for predicted owner satisfaction.

The F-150 lands slightly lower on Consumer Reports’ list. The truck finishes in sixth place out of the organization’s 13 options with a predicted reliability score of two out of five and an owner satisfaction score of four out of five.

Based on Consumer Reports’ data, the Tundra will be far more reliable than the F-150.

Tundra vs. F-150 Gas Mileage and Towing

2023 Ford F-150 Towing

Both the F-150 and Tundra are available with hybrid powertrains. We consider the Tundra Hybrid to be its own model, while the F-150 Hybrid is classified as a trim level. So, we won’t be including the Tundra Hybrid in this comparison. The most efficient F-150 is the hybrid model with rear-wheel drive. It’s rated to get up to 25 mpg combined. The Tundra’s base powertrain isn’t nearly as efficient with a combined fuel economy rating of up to 20 mpg.

When properly configured, the F-150 handedly bests the Tundra when it comes to towing capacity. The Tundra is rated to tow up to 12,000 pounds, while the F-150 can tow up to 14,000 pounds. The F-150 leads the full-size class for towing capacity with its stout figure. In comparison, the Tundra lags behind as one of the least capable trucks in the segment.

Tundra vs. F-150 Size

2022 Toyota Tundra Bed

Both the F-150 and Tundra are classified as full-size pickup trucks. They’re similar in size and available with similar configurations. Ford offers the F-150 with three bed sizes: 5.5-foot bed, 6.5-foot bed, and an eight-foot bed. The trend is available with nearly identical beds, though its long bed measures in at 8.1 feet.

Ford and Toyota offer both of their full-size pickup trucks in large crew cab body styles, though the names differ. When similarly configured in their largest configurations, the F-150 offers more front and rear legroom, rear headroom, as well as front and rear shoulder room. In addition to having a large cabin than the Tundra, the F-150 is available with an extra seat to have seating for up to six people.

Which Is Better: Toyota Tundra or Ford F-150?

For consumers that aren’t worried about having the most efficient engine available, having the most towing capacity, or the largest interior, the Toyota Tundra is a good option. The Tundra offers enough capability for most, is available with high-tech features, and has a cabin that feels spacious. Its wide lineup also includes everything from work-oriented trucks to off-roaders and all the way up to a high-end model.

With that being said, the Ford F-150 wins this comparison. It’s the most capable full-size truck available, has an efficient hybrid engine, is more affordable than the Tundra, and is available in more configurations than the Tundra. We think the F-150 is the better option for most buyers, though we recommend considering both trucks and weighing out their pros and cons for your unique priorities.

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

Privacy Terms of Use Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information Disclaimer Cookie Policy Manage Preferences
COPYRIGHT 1999-2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba CarsDirect.com