GMC Acadia vs. Buick Enclave

By

Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter | Website

, Automotive Editor - January 31, 2019

General Motors has multiple brands under its belt, and when it comes to large SUVs, the American automaker has numerous choices for consumers. If you're looking for something that rivals a minivan when it comes to versatility, GMC has the Acadia, while Buick offers the Enclave. Despite being extremely similar, the Acadia handily outsells the Enclave. Is GMC's option the ultimate SUV for families, or is the Enclave the better choice?

See a side-by-side comparison of the Acadia & Enclave »

What the Acadia Gets Right

The Acadia is the more affordable option of the two. Pricing for the 2019 Acadia starts at $29,995, while the 2019 Enclave is way more expensive with a price tag of $40,995 (prices include destination).

In addition to saving you money up front, the Acadia will also save you money at the pumps. With its standard 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, the Acadia earns an EPA-estimated 21 miles per gallon in the city, 26 mpg on the highway, and 23 combined. The Enclave is only available with a V6, which lowers the SUV's ratings to 18/26/21 mpg (city/highway/combined).

While closely related, the Acadia and the Enclave are different lengths. If you spend a lot of time in urban areas, you'll appreciate the Acadia's more compact dimensions. The Acadia is 193.6 inches long, while the Enclave is 204.3 inches long, which makes the GMC easier to drive in tight areas.

What the Enclave Gets Right

If you're looking for a seven-passenger SUV, cargo capacity probably ranks high on your list. If that's the case, the Enclave is the better choice, as it offers a total of 97.6 cubic feet of cargo space, compared to the Acadia's 79 cubic feet. Behind the second row, the Enclave has 58 cubic feet of cargo space, while there's 23.6 cubic feet of space behind the third row. In the Acadia, there's 41.7 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row and 12.8 cubic feet of space behind the third row.

Both the Enclave and the Acadia can be fitted with a V6 engine, but Buick offers the six-cylinder engine as standard, while it's optional on the GMC. In both vehicles, the engine produces 310 horsepower. In the Enclave, the engine helps the SUV have a maximum towing capacity of 5,000 pounds. That figure is a little less in the Acadia, which is rated to tow up to 4,000 pounds.

While the Acadia and the Enclave are both upscale vehicles, Buick has packed its SUV with more high-end features. Standard equipment on the Enclave includes 18-inch wheels, a hands-free power liftgate, heated side mirrors, LED headlights, an eight-inch touchscreen, and an auto-dimming rearview mirror as standard.

More Space, More Luxury, More Everything

Yes, the GMC Acadia and the Buick Enclave are awfully similar, but for those seeking a more spacious, more capable, and more luxurious vehicle, the Enclave is the better option. While it's more expensive, it's also a stronger value proposition, as it comes with more standard features, while the Avenir trim is even more luxurious than GMC's tried-and-true Denali.

Our Verdict: Buick Enclave

When it comes to seating seven passengers in comfort, the Buick Enclave is the more comfortable option. It has more passenger space and more cargo capacity, which makes it a better choice if you plan to use the SUV as an alternative to a minivan.

Take a closer look at the GMC Acadia »

Take a closer look at the Buick Enclave »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter | Website