GMC Yukon vs. Ford Expedition

By

Automotive Editor

John Diether has been a professional writer, editor, and producer since 1997. His work can be found on TV, radio, web, and various publications throughout the world.  He is a graduate of Northwestern University and has a 1992 Cadillac Brougham d’Elegance in his garage. 


, Automotive Editor - August 21, 2018

While most families have migrated to car-based crossovers, plenty of buyers sill want the capability of traditional SUVs like the GMC Yukon and Ford Expedition. They can tow trailers and carve their own roads, all while offering just about every convenience in the universe. Which one does more to win over die-hard fans of full-size SUVs?

See a side-by-side comparison of the Yukon & Expedition »

What the Yukon Gets Right

Like the Expedition, the Yukon rides on a truck platform, so it can pull up to 8,500 pounds and go places that car-based vehicles can't. GMC piles on the standard equipment to make the Yukon family-friendly right out of the box. Depending on the seating arrangement, the Yukon can accommodate nine, eight, or seven passengers. With the back rows folded, there's 94.7 cubic feet of available cargo space. The extended-length XL model can swallow up to 121.7 cubic feet of stuff.

The standard 5.3-liter V8 provides 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque. Paired with a six-speed automatic transmission, the engine returns an EPA-estimated 19 miles per gallon in combined city and highway driving, or 18 mpg with four-wheel drive.

The line-topping Denali receives a 6.2-liter V8 with 420 hp and a 10-speed automatic transmission. GM's Magnetic Ride Control suspension provides a more luxurious and stable ride.

What the Expedition Gets Right

The Expedition has been completely redesigned with emphasis on technology and efficiency. Unlike its key rivals, the Expedition doesn't use a V8 engine. Under the hood is a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 with 375 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque. Output increases to 400 hp in top Platinum trim. A 10-speed automatic is standard across the board.

The Expedition is capable to towing 9,200 pounds, as high as it gets in this class. EPA ratings are better than average at 20 mpg combined with rear-wheel drive, or 19 mpg with four-wheel drive.

The interior has room for eight passengers, or seven with the optional second-row captain's chairs. With all seats folded, there's 108.3 cubic feet of cargo space. The extended Expedition Max model can hold a class-leading 130 cubic feet.

What's the Difference?

It's hard to imagine any buyer being disappointed with capability of these SUVs. In Denali trim, the Yukon is more luxurious than the Expedition Platinum, as well as faster thanks to the 6.2-liter V8. Everywhere else in their lineups, the Expedition gets the nod for its pulling power, cargo space, and standard 10-speed transmission.

Our Verdict: Ford Expedition

Buyers looking for anything less than a full-luxury SUV will find the Ford Expedition more in tune with their needs.

Take a closer look at the GMC Yukon »

Take a closer look at the Ford Expedition »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

John Diether has been a professional writer, editor, and producer since 1997. His work can be found on TV, radio, web, and various publications throughout the world.  He is a graduate of Northwestern University and has a 1992 Cadillac Brougham d’Elegance in his garage.