Honda Ridgeline vs. Ford F-150

By

Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009 and has been published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also hosts a web-series car-review show and dabbles in the world of personal-finance writing.

His specialty is in the high-performance realm, but he has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Before diving into the world of writing, Justin was an automotive technician and manager for six years and spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

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, Automotive Editor - September 22, 2016

The pickup truck formula didn't change a whole lot until the beginning of the 2000s when their popularity exploded outside of the construction biz. This spread to the general public and allowed the Ridgeline to break the mold of the pickup with its unibody configuration and crossover-meets-pickup utility. After a brief hiatus, the Ridgeline returns in 2017 with a new look that mimics the new Honda Pilot, and some of the most innovative features on a pickup to date.

The F-150, on the other hand, sets the pickup truck mold. It’s a stone-hauling, stump pulling, working person’s truck that is also plenty capable on the road in its higher trims.

See the side-by-side comparison of the Ridgeline & F-150 »

Which pickup makes more sense in the modern era?

What the Honda Ridgeline Gets Right

The new-generation Ridgeline simply builds on what the last-gen model started. It takes the idea of a pickup truck, scales that back some and injects comfort and convenience features you never knew you needed.

The look of the Ridgeline is great for buyers who prefer the sleeker look of crossovers, and its standard crew-cab setup is perfect for families. It also adds a little extra convenience with its under-bed trunk/cooler, dual-action tailgate, and available in-bed audio and 110-volt outlet.

While the Ridgeline’s 3.5-liter V6 can’t hang with the raw power of the F-150’s engines, its 22 mpg combined does beat out the base engine in the Ford.

Finally, where the Ridgeline will win over buyers is in overall comfort. Its roomy cabin has lots of space for people and things, its ride is second to none in its class, and its upscale options can appease any buyer, particularly families who like to tailgate.

What the Ford F-150 Gets Right

In a word, the F-150 offers choices. Buyers can choose from among nine trim levels, three cab sizes, three bed lengths, four engines, and rear-wheel or four-wheel drive. Trim choices run from the no-frills XL up to the super-luxury Platinum.

Engines, too, are a diverse set. The base 3.7-liter V6 and 5-liter V8 appeal to traditionalists, but most buyers are expected to opt for either the new 2.7-liter Ecoboost V6 or 3.5-liter Ecoboost V6 that provide more torque.

And the F-150 is thoroughly modern, beyond the aluminum body that shaves hundreds of pounds off the weight of the outgoing model. There's a whole raft of connectivity and luxury features inside, with an actually plush interior and the latest safety gear—and even a panoramic moonroof.

Can the Ridgeline Really Compete with the F-150?

The Honda Ridgeline offers commuters a comfortable ride and crossover-like features with the option to carry large and bulky cargo loads, but its versatility stops there. On the other hand, Ford F-150 buyers can create a truck that is tailored to their specific needs and budget with off-road capability, power to tow up to 11,000 pounds, and a range of configurations and features.

Our Verdict: Ford F-150

While the Ridgeline finally has some of the features that true truck buyers are looking for, it just doesn’t measure up to the possibilities of the Ford F-150, especially now that its fuel economy and weight have been addressed.

Take a closer look at the Honda Ridgeline »

Take a closer look at the Ford F-150 »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009 and has been published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also hosts a web-series car-review show and dabbles in the world of personal-finance writing.

His specialty is in the high-performance realm, but he has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Before diving into the world of writing, Justin was an automotive technician and manager for six years and spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

Follow On: Twitter | Website

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