Hyundai Kona vs. Hyundai Tucson

By

Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - June 14, 2018

Hyundai has been stepping up its game recently. First, the South Korean brand set its sights on sedans. Now, the automaker is branching out in an attempt to become a leader in the compact and subcompact SUV segments. The Hyundai Tucson undercut the competition in terms of pricing, while having a long list of features, a handsome exterior, and an upscale cabin.

With the new Kona, Hyundai looks to maintain its winning recipe in the highly-competitive subcompact SUV segment. If you're looking to get into a SUV from Hyundai, should you go with the Kona or the Tucson? That's what's we're here to answer.

See a side-by-side comparison of the Tucson & Kona »

What the Kona Gets Right

The Kona is Hyundai's latest and greatest. It's the automaker's smallest SUV, measuring in at just 164 inches long, 70.9 inches wide, and 61 inches tall. The Kona is noticeably smaller than the Tucson, which is 12 inches longer, roughly 2 inches wider, and 3.8 inches taller. Because of its small stature, the Kona is the obvious choice for consumers living in urban areas

If you're on a tighter budget, the Kona is the SUV that gets the nod. Hyundai's subcompact starts at $20,480, including the $980 destination fee. That's $3,050 less than the Tucson's starting price. You can step up to the Kona SEL for just $100 more than the Tucson's base price.

Fuel economy is another upside to the Kona. The most fuel efficient versions of the SUV are both powered by 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engines. Because of its small size, the Kona can get up to 28 mpg in the city and 32 mpg on the highway. The Tucson lags behind with an EPA rating of up to 25 mpg in the city and 30 mpg on the highway.

What the Tucson Gets Right

The major benefit to going with the Tucson over the Kona is the more spacious cabin. The Tucson offers passengers with 102.2 cubic feet of passenger volume. The Kona's passenger volume measures in at 94.1 cubic feet. Total interior volume is up in the Tucson, as well. The compact SUV has a total of 133.2 total interior volume, while the Kona only has 113.3 cubic feet.

More importantly, the Tucson is capable of holding more cargo than the Kona. With the rear seats in place, the Tucson's cargo area measures in at 31.0- cubic feet. Fold the seats down, and the SUV can hold up to 61.9 cubic feet. The smaller Kona is rated to hold 19.2 cubic feet of cargo with the rear seats in place and 45.8 cubic feet with them folded down.

The Tucson is the more powerful SUV of the two, as well. The most powerful Tucson is equipped with a 2.4-liter inline-four that makes 181 hp. The Kona's most powerful engine is a 1.6-liter turbocharged inline-four that is rated to make 175 hp.

Drive in Tight Spots?

If you live in an urban area or need to parallel park on a regular basis, the Kona is the better choice of the two. Its smaller size makes it to easier to drive. Also, if you have a long commute or rack up a lot of miles in a year, the Kona will be easier on your wallet, as it gets better fuel economy.

Verdict: Hyundai Tucson

Apart from its smaller size and more affordable price tag, the Tucson is the better SUV for the majority of people. It's small enough to where it's easy to drive, but large enough on the inside where you're not having to compromise on cargo space. Compared to the competition in the compact SUV segment, the Tucson is a much better value proposition, as well.

Take a closer look at the Hyundai Tucson »

Take a closer look at the Hyundai Kona »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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