Hyundai Tucson vs. Kia Sportage

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - May 18, 2021

For consumers looking to buy a small SUV that offers a lot of value, two of the better options include the Hyundai Tucson and Kia Sportage. The 2022 Hyundai Tucson arrives as an all-new vehicle for the model year. With a daring redesign, an available plug-in hybrid powertrain, a new N-Line model, and tons of tech, the 2022 Tucson doubles-down on being a well-rounded option.

We wouldn’t call the current Kia Sportage old, but the recent generation debuted in 2017 and a few updates were introduced in 2020. So, it’s not nearly as new as the Tucson. While Kia is reportedly working on a redesigned Sportage, that model won’t arrive until 2022 as a 2023 model. Still, the Sportage stands out in the compact class for its high-quality interior and easy-to-use tech features.

If you’re shopping for a compact crossover SUV, which South Korean option should you go with? That’s what we’ll answer below with a comparison of some of the key specs and features.

See a side-by-side comparison of the Hyundai Tucson & the Kia Sportage »

What The Hyundai Tucson Gets Right

With three different available powertrains, the Tucson has a major advantage when it comes to engine choices. Hyundai offers the Tucson in regular, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and a sporty N Line trim, giving consumers more options and ways to get better fuel economy. Official fuel economy figures for the 2022 Tucson aren’t out yet, but the Tucson Hybrid can get up to 38 mpg combined. We expect better figures from the Tucson PHEV. The Sportage is rated to get 26 mpg combined.

On the tech front, the new Tucson comes with more tech features than the Sportage. Both SUVs come with a standard 8-inch touchscreen, but the Tucson has wireless smartphone compatibility, while the Sportage is wired only. Hyundai offers the Tucson with a 10.25-inch touchscreen that the Sportage can’t match.

The new Tucson is larger than the outgoing model on the inside, bringing more rear-seat space and a larger cargo area. The Tucson offers more rear legroom and headroom, as well as more front headroom than the Sportage. When it comes to cargo space, the Tucson offers up to 80.3 cubic feet of cargo space, while the Sportage trails behind with 60.1 cubic feet of cargo space.

What The Kia Sportage Gets Right

As the older model, the Sportage is the more affordable choice. Pricing for the Sportage starts at $25,265 with destination, while the Tucson starts at $26,135. For consumers on a tight budget, the more affordable Sportage is the better option of the two.

Few compact SUVs are as boldly designed as the Tucson, but some consumers may not like the vehicle’s futuristic design. If you don’t find the new Tucson’s design to be attractive, the more upscale Sportage is the way to go. Its H-shaped grille, swept-back headlights, and high fender arches result in a sporty, but high-end design.

New Versus Old

The 2022 Hyundai Tucson easily beats the Kia Sportage in this comparison. With more engines to choose from, fuel-efficient models, more tech features, and a larger interior, the Tucson is the better option for the majority of consumers. While the Tucson costs more than the Sportage, it’s better in nearly every category.

Our Verdict: Hyundai Tucson

With the all-new Tucson, Hyundai has brought its A-Game to take on the best of the best in the compact class. In the process, it leaves the Sportage in its wake.

Take a closer look at the Hyundai Tucson »

Take a closer look at the Kia Sportage »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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