Mazda CX-30 vs. Nissan Rogue Sport

By

Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - January 27, 2020

With more consumers wanting SUVs and crossovers of all shapes and sizes, automakers are introducing multiple options for a segment. Both Mazda and Nissan have vehicles that compete in the subcompact crossover segment. For Mazda, it’s the new CX-30. When it comes to Nissan’s lineup, that job belongs to the Rogue Sport.

While both the CX-30 and the Rogue Sport are subcompact crossovers, they have a lot of differences. For one, the CX-30 was just introduced for the 2020 model year, while the Rogue Sport debuted back in 2017. To keep the Rogue Sport fresh against new competition like the CX-30, it gets refreshed styling and more standard safety features.

Do the changes make the Rogue Sport a better choice than the CX-30? That’s what we’ll answer below.

See a side-by-side comparison of the CX-30 & Rogue Sport »

What the CX-30 Gets Right

The CX-30 kicks things off with a win the pricing category. Carrying a starting price of $22,945 including destination, the CX-30 is the cheaper option. The base Rogue Sport costs $24,335. The $1,390 difference allows you to upgrade to an all-wheel-drive CX-30 for just $10 more than the Rogue Sport’s starting price.

When it comes to performance, the CX-30 is the clear winner. Mazda’s crossover comes with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that makes 186 horsepower. The Rogue Sport is powered by a 2.0-liter four-cylinder that’s rated at 141 hp. Despite having more power, the CX-30 is just as efficient as the Rogue Sport. Both models earn an EPA-estimated 28 miles per gallon combined.

With the CX-30 having a lower starting price than the Rogue Sport, one would think that the crossover would come with less features, but that’s not the case. The CX-30 comes standard with LED headlights, an 8.8-inch touchscreen, adaptive cruise control, and more.

What the Rogue Sport Gets Right

Subcompact crossovers aren’t known for having spacious cabins, but the Rogue Sport beats the CX-30 when it comes to interior space. The Rogue Sport has roughly 2 cubic feet more passenger space than the CX-30. That results in more front head room, front and rear shoulder room, front and rear hip room, and front leg room.

The CX-30 may be the option to come with a larger infotainment display, but the Rogue Sport has standard smartphone compatibility. Nissan fits the Rogue Sport with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as standard. The base CX-30 doesn’t come with either until the Select trim.

Better in All the Right Places

The Mazda CX-30 shines in this comparison. The subcompact crossover only falls behind the Nissan Rogue Sport when it comes to interior space. If it weren’t for that, the CX-30 would be a runaway winner.

If interior space is the only thing you care about, the Rogue Sport is a fine option. As a complete package, the CX-30 is the better choice.

Our Verdict: Mazda CX-30

With a more powerful engine, more standard features, a more upscale feel, and a more affordable starting price, the Mazda CX-30 is our choice in this comparison. It’s poised to stand out as one of the best options in the subcompact class and manages to hit all of the right notes for consumers looking for a small crossover.

Take a closer look at the Mazda CX-30 »

Take a closer look at the Nissan Rogue Sport »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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