Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class vs. Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - January 31, 2020

Mercedes-Benz is expanding its lineup with an all-new option: the GLB-Class. The GLB is a unique vehicle that features a boxy design borrowed from the G-Class and the brand's latest high-tech features. Consumers looking for something a little bigger and curvier will be drawn toward the GLC-Class.

The two crossovers have other differences than just size that may have you leaning toward one over the other. Check out this comparison to see whether you should pick up a GLB or a GLC.

See a side-by-side comparison of the GLB-Class & GLC-Class»

What the GLB-Class Gets Right

As the smaller model, the Mercedes GLB is also the more affordable option. Pricing for the GLB starts at $37,595, while the GLC costs $43,495. The $5,900 difference goes a long way in savings or could be used to tack on a lot of optional packages.

In addition to saving you money in the initial purchase, the GLB is more fuel efficient than the GLC. The GLB earns an EPA-estimated 26 miles per combined compared to the GLC's 24 mpg combined.

With its smaller stature, the GLB is also the easier model to drive in tight areas. The GLB is nearly an inch smaller in length and 3 inches shorter in width, making it the better option for city dwellers.

Despite having a smaller footprint, the GLB crucially offers seating for up to seven passengers. The GLC only has seating for up to five. Additionally, the GLB offers more maximum cargo space. The maximum cargo capacity in the GLB is 62 cubic feet, while the GLC only offers 56.5.

Consumers seeking a boxy, rugged vehicle will enjoy the GLB’s design. Compared to the curvier GLC, the GLB looks more upright and ready to tackle off-road terrain. It’s a personal preference thing, but it’s something that separates the two models.

What the GLC-Class Gets Right

The Mercedes GLC is available in five trims, including a hybrid and three AMG performance variants, while the GLB is only available in one. With more options, you’re more likely to get into a GLC that fits all of your needs.

Performance is in the GLC’s corner. The base model comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that makes 255 horsepower. The range-topping AMG GLC 63 S is powered by a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 that’s good for 503 hp. The only engine the GLB is offered with is a 221-hp 2.0-liter turbo-four.

The GLB may be an all-new model, but the GLC is the winner when it comes to tech features. Both come with the automaker’s latest infotainment system, but the GLC comes with a 10.25-inch touchscreen as standard, which bests the GLB's 7-inch unit.

The GLC can also be fitted with more premium interior features, including sport front seats, heated rear seats, three-zone climate control, and Nappa leather upholstery.

Need Seating for Seven?

The GLB-Class and the GLC-Class are competitors, but the one crucial difference between the two is that the GLB has seating for up to seven. The third row of seats isn’t exactly spacious, but they’re there for families that need them.

Our Verdict: Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

While the Mercedes GLC lacks a third row, it has more available trims, high-performance engines, and a design that should appeal to more consumers. It also excels as a luxury crossover, while the GLB needs some optional features, which are pricey, to be at the same level.

Take a closer look at the Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class»

Take a closer look at the Mercedes-Benz GLB-Class »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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