Nissan Murano vs. Ford Edge

By

Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

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, Automotive Editor - January 21, 2015

The number of models in the crossover SUV arena seems to increase constantly, and the Nissan Murano and Ford Edge have been doing battle within this segment since the Edge hit the market in 2007. The Murano has a leg up on the Edge in term of overall experience -- it has been available since 2003, four years longer than the Edge.

See a side-by-side comparison of the Murano & Edge >>

So, has the younger Edge finally progressed enough to overtake the more experienced Murano?

What the Murano Gets Right

To start things off, the Nissan Murano has one of the best interiors this side of a luxury SUV. The base model comes well-equipped with automatic dual-zone climate control; a height-adjustable seat; 7-inch monochrome screen; and a six-speaker audio system. As you move up in trim level, things only get better inside the Murano’s cabin.

Additionally, the Murano is rather nimble for a midsize crossover, as it changes direction with minimal resistance. Under the hood, the Murano also shines with a 3.5-liter V6 that produces 260 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque. Combined with a continuously variable transmission, the Murano gets 24 mpg highway with front-wheel drive and 23 mpg highway with all-wheel drive.

What the Edge Gets Right

The first thing we notice about the Edge is its outward appearance -- it really looks the part of an SUV instead of a lifted wagon. Like the Murano, the Edge's cabin is well laid out and equipped with high-end features: a six-speaker audio system; tilt and telescoping wheel; and three 12-volt power outlets. Additionally, the Edge's interior is whisper-quiet, leaving drivers and passengers feeling as if they are in a true luxury SUV.

Under the hood, the Edge has three engines to choose from. The standard model comes with a 3.5-liter V6 engine that produces an impressive 285 horsepower and 253 pound-feet of torque, and gets up to 27 mpg highway. As an option, buyers can toss in an EcoBoost 2-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine with 240 horsepower and 270 pound-feet of torque -- fuel efficiency jumps to 30 mpg. On Sport models, buyers get a 305-horsepower 3.7-liter V6 that turns in 26 mpg highway and a 7.5-seconds 0-to-60 mph time.

Why Buy a Murano?

Despite losing ground to the Edge, the Murano still has a great argument for buyers. Few manufacturers can claim the top-notch build quality that all Nissan models boast. Just as importantly, though, the Murano offers exterior styling that will remain relevant for many years after the Edge starts looking dated.

Verdict: Ford Edge

With its trio of engine options, superior performance, hefty towing capacity and super-quiet interior, the Edge has certainly overtaken the Murano. Another key reason for choosing the Edge is its superior fuel economy -- buyers can get up to 6 mpg more from the Edge.

Take a closer look at the Nissan Murano >>

Take a closer look at the Ford Edge >>

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

Follow On: Google+ | Website