Nissan Rogue vs. Honda CR-V

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Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

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, Automotive Editor - May 23, 2018

Despite never being the sexiest option, the Nissan Rogue remains the best-selling compact crossover in the US. Yes, even better than the popular Honda CR-V. The battle has always been hot between the Rogue and CR-V, and now with the Rogue stepping up its tech game with semi-autonomous driving and a hybrid model, it's primed to continue to lead its class. Sure, the Rogue outsells the CR-V, but is this Nissan the better buy? See what we think below.

What the Rogue Gets Right

The Nissan Rogue checks in with extremely safe styling that mimics the rest of the Nissan lineup nicely. While some may find this a touch boring, there are plenty who'll prefer it to the new CR-V. Inside, the Rogue does a nice job of putting everything where it should be and keeping things a bit more stylish than its body may allude to. Also, the new standard seven-inch touchscreen, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto are nice touches.

Safety is also front and center for the Rogue, as it comes standard with all the goodies the IIHS loves to see, including automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring, and rear cross-traffic alert. What’s more, the Rogue also has the newest Nissan tech, ProPilot, as an option on the SL trim. This system allows the Rogue to nearly drive itself on single-lane highways.

While its fermented-dino-blood-powered model lacks in the fuel economy department, the Rogue Hybrid’s EPA-estimated up to 33 miles per gallon city, 35 highway, and 34 combined make it one of the thriftiest models in its class.

What the CR-V Gets Right

The CR-V’s styling, while not for everyone, is a bit more playful and creative than the Rogue, making it a little more extrovert-friendly. Inside, while the base LX does lack in features, it still feels like a more upscale model. Adding to this feel is the whopping 40.4 inches of rear seat leg room and 75.8 cubic feet of max cargo room. Despite all the additional room, the 2018 CR-V’s $25,245 base price (destination fees included) is $530 cheaper than the 2018 Rogue.

Under its hood, the CR-V wins on all the output fronts. Its base 2.4-liter engine delivers 184 horsepower, while its 1.5-liter turbocharged four-pot chimes in with 190 hp of its own and respectable fuel economy.

Though it doesn’t have the standard safety features the Rogue has, the CR-V does have optional Honda Sensing, which includes automatic emergency braking, lane keeping assist, adaptive cruise control, and more.

Safety First? Go Rogue

The Rogue can’t quite match everything the CR-V offers, but it does hold its own very well, particularly in the safety department. With its standard safety equipment checking all the IIHS’ boxes and optional ProPilot adding tech never seen in this class, the Rogue is a great pick for those who want safety first.

Verdict: Honda CR-V

The Honda CR-V continues its reign as one of the best compact crossovers, even in the face of the safety-focused, top-selling Nissan Rogue. The CR-V is still our recommendation because it checks all the most important boxes that shoppers in this class are looking for: roominess, cargo capacity, and fuel economy.

Take a closer look at the Nissan Rogue »

Take a closer look at the Honda CR-V »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

Follow On: Google+ | Website