Nissan Rogue vs. Nissan Murano

By

Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

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, Automotive Editor - March 7, 2018

With the crossover segment getting more and more congested every year, we’re starting to see a ton of overlap between models on dealer lots. While all the options will benefit the buyer in the end, this can sometimes create a little confusion while shopping.

This is precisely what can happen when comparing the Nissan Murano and Nissan Rogue. Sure, their looks and powertrains are vastly different, but they actually have a lot more similarities than one would expect.

So which is the better buy for the average family? The results may surprise you.

See a side-by-side comparison of the Murano & Rogue »

What the Murano Gets Right

The Murano kicks things off with a bang in the form of a far more stylish body than the Rogue. Some may find it a tad over the top, but it’s much better than the vanilla Rogue. Inside, buyers will find the style continues, but the big news here are its standard features: two USB ports, navigation, an eight-inch touchscreen, and more.

The Murano also gets a big leg up in the powertrain department. The Murano’s standard 3.5-liter V6 engine delivers 260 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque, besting the Rogue by 90 hp and 65 lb-ft of torque.

Finally, the Murano delivers a super-comfortable ride that experts rave about. While the Rogue is no slouch in this department, it’s no match for the Murano.

What the Rogue Gets Right

The Rogue’s starting price of $25,775 (destination fees included) is a whopping $6,000 less than the Murano. In fact, buyers can opt for the midrange Rogue SV with all-wheel drive and still have $3,430 to put toward options. What’s more, for the buyer who finds the Murano a bit too stylish, the Rogue is about as plain as they come.

With its four-cylinder powertrain, the non-hybrid Rogue delivers excellent fuel economy at up to 26 miles per gallon city, 33 highway, and 29 combined. This handily beats the Murano by five mpg across the board. Tap into the electrified Rogue Hybrid and you’ll unlock up to 33 mpg city, 35 highway and 34 combined.

Hauling cargo? The Rogue’s cargo capacity with the seats in place and folded checks in at 39.3 cubic feet and 70 cubic feet, respectively. The Murano, on the other hand, comes in a bit short at 37 cubes with the seats up and 67 cubes with the seats folded.

Finally, Nissan's ProPilot active safety system is a huge selling point for the Rogue, as it allows this crossover to drive short distances without any human intervention. Sure, it’s still imperfect, but it’s a dang good start.

Deeper Pockets? Get the Murano.

If money isn’t a determining factor, the Murano’s added power, roomier rear seats, and sharper styling make it an easy choice.

Verdict: Nissan Rogue

While it was a tight battle, the Rogue’s much lower price makes it a far easier pill to swallow for the average family.

Take a closer look at the Nissan Rogue »

Take a closer look at the Nissan Murano »


Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Justin Cupler has specialized as an automotive writer since 2009, and has seen himself published in multiple websites and online magazines. In addition to contributing to CarsDirect, Justin also works as editor in chief for a large performance car online publication. His specialty lays in the high-performance realm, but has a deep love and understanding for all things automotive. Prior to being an automotive writer, he was an automotive technician and manager for six years, but spent the majority of his younger life tinkering with classic muscle cars.

Follow On: Google+ | Website