Nissan Rogue Sport vs. Rogue

By

Automotive Editor

After graduating from GMI with a bunch of other car geeks, Matt Pilgrim spent time in many areas of the auto industry - manufacturing, durability testing of prototypes, and collaborating with stylists to engineer exterior components for cars such as the NSX. Turning his attention to journalism, he brings together his engineering background and passion for cars and has written for several automotive publications and sites, including The Car Connection and his own site, Pilgrim Motor Press.


, Automotive Editor - December 16, 2022
2022 Nissan Rogue

One might expect that the Nissan Rogue and Rogue Sport have more in common than they actually do, especially now that the Rogue has received a redesign for 2022 while the Rogue Sport carries on with a design from 2017. That lack of investment is a sign of what lies ahead for the Rogue Sport as it is expected to be discontinued. Should you pick up one before it’s too late or does the Rogue the better package?

Rogue Sport vs. Rogue Price

2022 Nissan Rogue Sport

The model-year 2022 Rogue is already sold out and the 2023 model (which received very few updates) is in short supply. Expectedly, there is not an enticing lease deal and promotional finance rates for a 36-month loan have been increasing in each of the three past months.

Nissan announced that the Rogue Sport will be discontinued following the 2022 model year and dealership inventory levels are reduced due to supply chain constraints so it may be difficult to obtain your desired specification. The Rogue Sport actually has a worse lease rate than the Rogue and there are no rebate offers.

The 2022 Rogue Sport’s smaller size and reduced number of standard features enable a lower starting price of just under $26,000 compared to the 2023 Rogue’s $28,585 price. The Rogue also offers more options that enable it to creep up to nearly $40,000.

Rogue Sport vs. Rogue Size

2022 Nissan Rogue Sport

The Rogue Sport is about ten inches less than the Rogue which stretches to 183 inches and is about four inches shorter (at 62.5 inches), however, the Rogue Sport matches its bigger brother’s 72-inch width. Interestingly, the Rogue is also equipped with a tighter turning radius, helping to make it nearly as urban-friendly.

The Rogue is rated for towing 1,500 lbs whereas the Rogue Sport is not rated for pulling trailers.

Nissan Rogue vs. Rogue Sport Interior

2023 Nissan Rogue Trunk

The Rogue’s greater length and newer design allow it to grow with the changing consumer expectations. The Rogue offers one to two inches more headroom, about five inches more rear legroom, and a larger trunk space.

By measurement, the Rogue offers 36.5 cubic feet which can grow to 74 cubic feet with the seat backs folded, which compares to the Rogue Sport’s 22.9 cubic feet behind the seat and a maximum of 36.5 cubic feet.

Rogue vs. Rogue Sport Gas Mileage

2022 Nissan Rogue Interior

The Rogue Sport is powered by a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and a continuously variable transmission. It’s not fast by any means and its EPA-estimated 28 miles per gallon combined fuel economy rating is not particularly impressive.

The Rogue achieves up to 33 MPG combined from its 1.5-liter three-cylinder turbocharged engine that puts out about 60 more horsepower and almost 75 more pound-feet of torque.

Adding all-wheel drive lowers the Rogue’s combined rating to 31 and lessens the Rogue Sport’s combined rating by one MPG point. Unlike competitors like the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4, Nissan doesn't offer a Rogue Hybrid.

Similarly, even though you can find plug-in hybrid and EV options now in this segment and Nissan certainly has the credentials to build one based on its experience with the LEAF, there is no Rogue PHEV or a Rogue EV option.

Rogue Sport vs. Rogue: Which Nissan To Buy?

The Rogue Sport provides advantages in maneuverability and a slightly lower starting price. However, the Rogue’s exterior and interior designs are far more modern and better suited to withstand the test of time, there are more safety features, and the infotainment system is better.

The differences only become more significant as one walks up the trim levels to gain features that aren’t even available on the lesser Rogue such as a power tailgate, tri-zone climate control, a dual-pane panoramic sunroof, and even styling packages. The Rogue is better equipped to meet the demands of the flexible American family. Whether it's a long road trip, where the better fuel economy from its powertrain or the ability to pack more cargo are key traits, or if it's the everyday commute where the added creature comforts and active safety gear help to minimize the amount of work involved with…getting to work.

The Rogue Sport is heading the way of the sunset and its aged design has prevented it from becoming more competitive. If the larger physical size and added initial expense are not prohibitive, the Nissan Rogue gets the definitive nod from us.

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

After graduating from GMI with a bunch of other car geeks, Matt Pilgrim spent time in many areas of the auto industry - manufacturing, durability testing of prototypes, and collaborating with stylists to engineer exterior components for cars such as the NSX. Turning his attention to journalism, he brings together his engineering background and passion for cars and has written for several automotive publications and sites, including The Car Connection and his own site, Pilgrim Motor Press.


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