Porsche 911 vs. Nissan GT-R

By

Automotive Editor

John Diether has been a professional writer, editor, and producer since 1997. His work can be found on TV, radio, web, and various publications throughout the world.  He is a graduate of Northwestern University and has a 1992 Cadillac Brougham d’Elegance in his garage. 


, Automotive Editor - September 15, 2016

Comparing a Nissan to a Porsche 911 doesn't make much sense—unless that Nissan happens to be the exhilarating GT-R. It's the only supercar in the family, and a good one at that.

Porsche's top performer for decades, the 911 retains its classic looks, but receives new turbocharged engines for even greater thrills.

Does the 911 still reign as the king of sports cars, or has the GT-R snatched the crown?

See a side-by-side comparison of the 911 & GT-R »

What the GT-R Gets Right

The GT-R is to the modern Japanese market what the Supra was back in the 1990s: a powerhouse that can dance with the world's best at a fraction of the price. The GT-R's long hood and swooping roofline give it a 370Z-on-steroids look that few models in the industry can match. Add to that its racy handling and exciting interior, and you have the kind of car that even adults dream about.

The GT-R's 3.8-liter twin-turbo V6 lays down 565 horsepower, and is teamed with a six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission and all-wheel drive. The NISMO version of the GT-R gets a boost to 600 horsepower, and scoots from zero to 60 mph in 2.9 seconds. Estimated top speed is 191 mph.

What the 911 Gets Right

One of the first things that any buyer will notice when shopping the 911 is the wide variety of trim options, from the entry-level Carrera to the range-topping Turbo S. On the outside, the Porsche 911 is an unmistakable icon that has evolved elegantly over the years. Inside, the 911 comes standard with all sorts of pleasing features, including full-grain leather seating, an Alcantara headliner, and a nine-speaker sound system.

This year's new 3-liter twin-turbo six-cylinder cranks out 370 horsepower in the Carrera, and 420 horsepower in the mid-level Carrera S. The 3-liter comes with your choice of a seven-speed manual or seven-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is optional.

The Turbo model gets a 3.8-liter twin-turbo six-cylinder with 540 horsepower, or 580 horsepower when installed in the line-topping Turbo S. The Turbo and Turbo S are rear-drive only, and come standard with the seven-speed automatic. Either version will take you from zero to 60 mph in under 3 seconds.

Why Buy the GT-R?

The GT-R gives the Porsche a slight scare, but the 911 still comes out on top. This does not mean that buyers should write off the GT-R, as it has a clear niche. In base form, it offers supercar performance for just north of $100,000, which makes it something of a bargain.

Our Verdict: Porsche 911

Going toe to toe with the 911 is a tough task for any sports car, let alone a relative newcomer like the GT-R. The 911 simply has too many variants and options for the GT-R to match. Besides, the 911 has been doing the sports car thing for 50 years now and, like a fine wine, only gets better with age.

Take a closer look at the Porsche 911 >>

Take a closer look at the Nissan GT-R >>

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

John Diether has been a professional writer, editor, and producer since 1997. His work can be found on TV, radio, web, and various publications throughout the world.  He is a graduate of Northwestern University and has a 1992 Cadillac Brougham d’Elegance in his garage.