Toyota Camry vs. Nissan Altima

By

Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - July 12, 2018

Mid-size sedans may not be as popular as they once were now that consumers have moved toward SUV and crossovers, but the Toyota Camry continues to be one of the best selling vehicles. The Camry is well regarded in the industry as being one of the best around because of its reliability, versatility, and value.

The Nissan Altima has been around a long time as well, and the Japanese automaker continues to make its mid-size offering better with more aggressive styling and features. There's not a lot that the new Altima can't do, but can it hold its own against the Camry?

See a side-by-side comparison of the Camry & Altima »

What the Altima Gets Right

Pricing continues to be one of the major factors for consumers shopping for a new vehicle. Drivers that want to get into the more affordable option will want to go with the Altima. Nissan's option starts at $24,145, including destination. The Camry is a little more expensive, with a price tag of $24,565. The range-topping variant of the Altima is also cheaper than the most expensive Camry. The Altima 3.5 SL costs $34,515, while the Camry XSE V6 is priced at $36,020.

Cargo capacity is in the Altima's favor, too. The Altima can hold up to 15.4 cubic feet of cargo, while the Camry can only hold 14.1 cubic feet. The Altima's interior is also a little more spacious than the Camry's with a total passenger volume of 101.9 cubic feet. The Camry's interior measures in at 100.4 cubic feet.

What the Camry Gets Right

Both the Camry and the Altima come with a four-cylinder engine as the base motor and have an available V6 on higher trims. The base 2.5-liter four-cylinder in the Camry makes 203 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. The Altima's standard engine produces 179 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque. The Camry's available 3.5-liter V6 is also more powerful than the Altima's option, with a rating of 301 hp compared to 270 hp.

Despite having more power, the Camry is the more fuel efficient vehicle of the two. The Camry is rated by the EPA to get up to 29 miles per gallon city and 41 mpg highway. The Altima trails behind with ratings of 27 mpg city and 38 mpg highway.

With more and more drivers on the road, safety is a large factor between choosing two vehicles. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) gave the Camry its highest safety rating by naming the sedan one of its Top Safety Pick Plus vehicles. The Altima can't quite match the Camry when it comes to safety, as the IIHS only named it as a Top Safety Pick.

Which One is the Ultimate Package?

There are a lot of things numbers can't portray with the two vehicles, like the way they drive or feel on the road. The new redesign has brought an extra dose of athleticism to the Camry, while the Altima is still the comfortable sedan that it's always been. The Camry's cozy and usable, but it also has a dynamic edge to it that the Altima can't match.

Our Verdict: Toyota Camry

There's a reason why the Toyota Camry manages to be one of the best selling cars in the United States. It's the ultimate all-around vehicle that does everything well. It may not be the best looking sedan on the market, but it’s fuel-efficient, safe, and has all of the latest features. The latest model has a sporty side that makes it better than before.

Take a closer look at the Toyota Camry »

Take a closer look at the Nissan Altima »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter | Website