Toyota RAV4 vs. Hyundai Tucson

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - April 29, 2019

The Toyota RAV4 is the benchmark of the compact crossover segment. Long held as one of the more well-rounded options, the RAV4 is an affordable vehicle that works well as a small-family vehicle. The sales figures back up the RAV4's popularity, too, as the crossover has consistently ranked at the top of the heap.

Compared to the RAV4, which has been around since the 1990s, the Hyundai Tucson is relatively young. It may not have the same historic nameplate as the RAV4, but the Tucson still hits all of the right notes that consumers want with a compact crossover. So, how does the RAV4 compare to the Tucson?

See a side-by-side comparison of the RAV4 & Tucson »

What the Tucson Gets Right

Hyundai is known for being a value-forward brand, and the Tucson continues that trend with an affordable price tag. The 2019 Tucson starts at $24,245, including destination, while the entry-level RAV4 carries a price tag of $26,595. The $2,350 difference between the Tucson and the RAV4 means that you can get into a higher trim with Hyundai's option and still save money.

With a more conservative design, the Tucson has a more spacious interior. The Tucson has more front head room, front and rear leg room, and front and rear hip room than the RAV4. Overall, the Tucson has more passenger volume than the RAV4 – 102.2 cubic feet in the Tucson compared to 98.9 cubic feet in the RAV4.

Crash-test wise, the Tucson is the safer option. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) named the Tucson a Top Safety Pick. The RAV4 missed out on the designation due to its “Marginal” headlights.

What the RAV4 Gets Right

The all-new 2019 RAV4 gives you more options than ever before. For drivers that enjoy getting dirty, the RAV4 has an Adventure trim with a more sophisticated all-wheel-drive system, extra terrain-specific modes, and a bunch of components that help it travel on terrain other than tarmac.

Drivers wanting to get good fuel economy can opt for the RAV4 Hybrid, which can get up to 40 miles per gallon combined, according to the EPA. The best the Tucson can muster is 26 mpg combined.

While down on overall passenger space to the Tucson, the RAV4 has the more spacious cargo area. The RAV4 can hold 37 cubic feet of cargo behind the second row. This figure opens up to 69 cubic feet in total. Hyundai's Tucson has 30.1 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second row and a total of 61.9 cubic feet of space.

When it comes to safety features, the RAV4 comes with Toyota Safety Sense 2.0 as standard, which includes forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control, lane keeping assist, lane departure warning, automatic high beams, and road sign assist.

It's All About Options

When it comes to giving you the ability to get into a perfect utility vehicle that has everything you need, the RAV4 has more configurations, which means more options to explore. With an available hybrid and an off-roading trim, the RAV4 simply has more to offer than the Hyundai Tucson. As long as you enjoy the styling, the RAV4 is the do-it-all crossover.

Our Verdict: Toyota RAV4

The new Toyota RAV4 is a more rugged, better compact crossover than before. It still manages to be a great daily vehicle with good cargo space and an excellent list of safety features, which makes it the winner in this comparison.

Take a closer look at the Toyota RAV4 »

Take a closer look at the Hyundai Tucson »

Side-by-side comparison of features, pricing, photos and more!

, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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