Why Are Subarus So Expensive Right Now?

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Senior Pricing Analyst

As CarsDirect’s resident pricing analyst, Alex offers must-know analyses of pricing & incentives to those looking to buy or lease a car. His consumer-oriented coverage of the latest trends and breaking news has been featured by The Wall Street Journal, Fox Business, Motor Trend, Automobile Magazine, and more.

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, Senior Pricing Analyst - November 19, 2021

Subaru may not be known for having deep discounts before the pandemic, but a chip shortage has resulted in exceptionally high prices. While there can be incentives to help save buyers money, the fact is that an inventory shortage is making Subarus particularly expensive and exceedingly difficult to find in stock.

As of this writing, Subaru has a 20 days' supply of vehicles. That's based on figures from Cox Automotive and represents the estimated amount of time it takes for a brand's vehicles to sell on a dealer's lot. For reference, that's almost worse than Toyota (19 days' supply) but slightly better than both Honda and Kia (both 17).

Given the fact that the industry average is currently 33 days, it's safe to say that Subarus are hard to find. For example, one major online shopping website lists less than 1,500 Foresters for sale in the entire United States. At Timmons Subaru in Long Beach, California, just 1 Forester is advertised as being in stock now.

While there are Subaru incentives for both buying and leasing, the company's lease deals and financing promotions generally aren't the best even under normal circumstances. For example, the Forester has no rebates whereas an SUV like the Jeep Grand Cherokee now offers 0% APR financing for up to 72 months.

New car prices are heavily based on the relationship between supply and demand. However, being able to pay MSRP could be a challenge. That's because dealers are free to set prices as they wish. This could mean having to pay some sort of dealer markup over MSRP depending on a dealer's individual pricing policy.

If you can find a dealer willing to sell a Subaru at MSRP, that could be a victory in itself for now. In some cases, it could make sense to put down a deposit with a dealer in order to secure a reservation on an incoming car. Doing research and choosing a good dealer near you could be a way to get the best deal possible.

Top Subaru Lease Deals & Rebates

, Senior Pricing Analyst

As CarsDirect’s resident pricing analyst, Alex offers must-know analyses of pricing & incentives to those looking to buy or lease a car. His consumer-oriented coverage of the latest trends and breaking news has been featured by The Wall Street Journal, Fox Business, Motor Trend, Automobile Magazine, and more.

Follow On: Twitter

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