Least EV-Friendly Cities In The U.S.

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Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

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, Automotive Editor - March 21, 2024
EV Charger

Purchasing and owning an electric vehicle isn’t as straightforward as it is with a gas-powered car. Gas stations are more readily available, gas-powered vehicles don’t take as long to fill up, and gas-powered cars can travel further than similarly equipped electric cars. With range anxiety and access to charging stations continuing to be major drawbacks with EV ownership, shoppers looking to make the switch from a gas-powered car to an EV will want to if their city or state is a good location for EV ownership. Thankfully, iSeeCars put out information on the least EV-friendly cities, metro areas, and states in the U.S. to help shoppers make an informed decision.

To gather its data, iSeeCars analyzed information on the number of Level 2 and Level 3 chargers in cities and states based on data from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuels Data Center. Using the available information, the outlet found what cities post the biggest challenges for current EV owners.

The least EV-friendly city in the U.S. based on iSeeCars’ data is Louisville, KY. Lousiville has only 412 total chargers compared to Los Angeles, CA (the most EV-friendly city in the U.S.), which has 21,537 total chargers. Birmingham, AL (428 total chargers), Milwaukee, WI (455 total chargers), Greensboro-Winston Salem, NC (509 total chargers), and Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport News, VA (646) round out the top five least EV-friendly cities.

iSeeCars also broke down the least EV-friendly cities based on the number of available chargers per resident. Having a good ratio of chargers to residents ensures that EV owners have easy access to chargers, even during busy charge times. Milwaukee, WI ranked as the least EV-friendly city, as it has 4,230 residents per charger. The national average is 1,848 residents per charger. Birmingham, AL (3,936 residents per charger), Cleveland-Akron (Canton), OH (3,906 residents per charger), Louisville, KY (3,807 residents per charger), and San Antonio, TX (3,775 residents per charger) were in the top five for the least EV-friendly metro areas.

Mercedes-Benz Charging

Data iSeeCars collected revealed the least EV-friendly states based on the number of available chargers and the number of residents per charger with Mississippi claiming the top spot (7,016 residents per charger and 419 total chargers). In comparison, Vermont ranked as the most EV-friendly state with 695 residents per charger and a total of 931 chargers. Louisiana (6,515 residents per charger and 702 total chargers), Alaska (5,963 residents per charger and 123 total chargers), Kentucky (5,5210 residents per charger and 820 total chargers), and Alabama (4,674 residents per charger and 1,093 total chargers) made it in the top five least EV-friendly states in the country.

iSeeCars’ findings for the least EV-friendly cities and states in the U.S. aren’t surprising. Most of the cities and states that made it on the least of least EV-friendly locations are in more rural parts of the country where an EV’s limited amount of range would make it difficult to live with. Interestingly, looking at information from the Tax Foundation, a lot of states that made it to the least EV-friendly locations have a higher annual vehicle registration fee for EVs that are meant to offset the state’s tax revenue from gas sales.

Alabama, for instance, charges EV shoppers an additional $200 to register their EV with the state annually. The state doesn’t have an EV credit in place for shoppers who want to buy an electric car, either. This is in sharp contrast to Vermont, which was found to be the most EV-friendly state, which gives interested EV shoppers up to $4,000 toward the purchase of an EV as a tax credit and doesn’t require owners to pay an additional annual registration fee.

If there’s some good news, it’s that the country’s EV charging infrastructure grew by roughly 24% in 2023 and it’s expected to continue to rise in 2024. Hopefully, cities and states that currently rank as the least friendly to EVs make the necessary changes over the next few years to encourage shoppers to make the switch to an EV.

Source: iSeeCars

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, Automotive Editor

Based out of the Washington, D.C. area, Joel Patel is an automotive journalist that hails from Northern Virginia. His work has been featured on various automotive outlets, including Autoweek, Digital Trends, and Autoblog. When not writing about cars, Joel enjoys trying new foods, wrenching on his car, and watching horror movies. 

Follow On: Twitter

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