The Disadvantages of Buying a Hybrid Car

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Automotive Editor

Rebecca Ballard is a freelance writer who specializes in the automotive industry. A unique interest in finding affordable and dependable automobiles keeps her busy researching the most up-to-date information in the automotive field.

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, Automotive Editor - February 5, 2015

Hybrid cars are all the rage as fuel prices fluctuate and more people are concerned about their carbon imprint. Most of the advertisements show off all of the positive aspects of owning a hybrid, but there are some disadvantages. Savvy buyers will do their research and make an educated choice.

Possible Safety Issues

In the event of an accident, some hybrid vehicles could present high voltage electrical problems. Cables are color-coded in bright orange and bright blue hues to help rescue workers identify compromised wires. Another issue could be a vehicle that has gone into silent mode after an accident but is not actually turned off.

Expensive Maintenance

Hybrid cars have been around for a while and advances in technology improve the vehicles each year, but the lifespan of the battery packs can be tricky. The first generation Toyota Prius has provided the most data, but it is just one out of many hybrid cars. In addition technicians require special training to work on hybrid vehicles. The neighborhood mechanic will probably not be able work on your car out of his home garage.

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Lack of Plug in Stations

Although plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles are made to travel long distances on one charge, drivers may find it difficult to locate charging stations outside urban areas. The Toyota RAV4 EV can travel approximately 125 miles on one charge. PHEVs or Plug-in-hybrid vehicles can charge with a standard 110 volt outlet, but most charge more quickly with a 220 volt which is not as easy to find.

Less Power

Setting up a race between a Ford Mustang and a Chevy Volt will show the dramatic difference in horsepower between a regular car and a hybrid. Although many hybrids are improving power, most still are made for city driving and not long distances or acceleration and speed.

Higher Price

While saving money in fuel costs, buying a hybrid car will require a higher price tag up front. The Lincoln MKZ Hybrid is unusual since it costs the same as a conventional MKZ. Buyers weighing the pros and cons of purchasing a hybrid need to decide how long it will take to recoup the price in contrast to fuel prices and how the car will be used.

, Automotive Editor

Rebecca Ballard is a freelance writer who specializes in the automotive industry. A unique interest in finding affordable and dependable automobiles keeps her busy researching the most up-to-date information in the automotive field.

Follow On: Google+ | Website